Feature Friday 15th September 2017; Kaitlyn Church

Today we are catching up with second year Bachelor of Photography student Kaitlyn Church who recently went to Malaysia’s premiere photography festival; Obscura in George Town, Penang. Kaitlyn was also selected as having one of the best projects in the Visual Document class, taught by Alana Holmberg and Bella Capezio.

Broken Wind, Kaitlyn Church, 2017

What was your visual documentary about?
A man named Stewart who repairs musical instruments in Thomastown at a place called Broken Wind. My brother and I grew up in band rooms, orchestra pits, and grand theatres. Music dictated our lives and we regularly opted to attend music lessons instead of actual class- often to the disgust of our other teachers. For me music was my means of escaping the stresses of day to day life when I played, I did not think of my worries, but was able to get lost in the rhythm.

What are you working on now?
I am in the middle of a series documenting a small town ‘Population of 7’ which is located in the Anakie Hills. This series documents the people and the landscape of Stieglitz. (It’s still a work-in-progress; I’m trying a few things at the moment but I haven’t decided on anything for certain yet)

Kaitlyn Church, ‘Population 7’, 2017

What are some challenges you have overcome?
I find every series I do challenging in some aspect. I actually started a completely different topic for this assignment but had to abandon it on the day due to terrible weather.

What series of work so far are you most proud of?
My series ‘Reborn’ which was recently on display at The Queen Victoria Women’s Centre is probably the one I’m most proud of. It was such a strange subject matter but I didn’t want to portray it as creepy-as these dolls are often deemed- and I think I was pretty successful in doing so.

Kaitlyn Church, ‘Reborn’, 2017

Do you have any plans for what you want to do with photography after studying?
I’m still not entirely sure where I want my photography to take me, I definitely have a strong interest in documentary and photojournalism so something along those lines would be great, but I don’t have any specific plans as of yet!

What was your experience of Obscura?
Obscura was fantastic! I worked with Leonard Pongo. It was challenging, but in a good way. It pushed me to produce work that is different to what I normally do, and change my practice; I can definitely see the changes since I’ve come back.

Did you learn anything about yourself/photography?
I went to Obscura with the intentions of doing something completely different to what I have done before, I wanted to challenge myself photographically. What I did not realise is how much it would push me in other aspects of my life. I was photographing people on public transport, which forced me to be more confident; especially when shooting.

 

Kaitlyn Church, 2017

What was your favourite moment?
The whole trip was fantastic, but I must say the screening was a standout moment. During the workshop week, I was always out shooting, so I didn’t get a chance to see what my peers were creating. Being able to view not only my own work on a large screen (which was an awesome experience) but to also see what everyone else had been doing that week was great! The quality of the work was outstanding- especially considering it was produced in a week.

Did it change your perception?
It was good to spend a week focusing on something completely different, and it has definitely encouraged me to approach my current work in another direction. I have been experimenting with some of the techniques I used to create that work, with the work I’m currently creating.

What was your work about? 
The work visually explores my habit of people watching especially on public transport.  I find it interesting how public transport brings together people who wouldn’t have been brought together in any other circumstance, and may never see each other again Whether it be the business man returning home from his 9-5 job who falls asleep as soon as he gets to his seat, or the tourist who only came up for the day, staring in awe at all the lights as the train pulls from the station.

 

Kaitlyn Church, 2017

How did you arrive at this idea?
I had been thinking about doing a project based on public transport for a while now. But I never really had the guts to pursue it. I was struggling to come up with an idea for my project for Obscura so I decided to finally continue with this concept.

What were some of the challenges you faced?
I’m not the most confident person or photographer, so jumping on a crowded bus with a large DSLR was not the easiest thing for me to do. Until this project I never noticed how loud a cameras shutter could be I was so scared someone would yell at me for taking their photo.

 

To see more of Kaitlyn’s work, follow her on Instagram

Feature Friday 1/9/2017; James Bugg

After almost missing an entry to the national awards, one of our final year Bachelor of Photography students James Bugg has won a silver at the Australian Professional Photography Awards in the landscape category.

James Bugg, 2017

 

What got you started in photography?

I had an interest ever since I was introduced to my father’s camera kit, my interest grew throughout high school and then I was just hooked.

When you first started at PSC did you have an idea of the photographer you wanted to be?
I always knew the kind of work I liked and was drawn to, however when I started at PSC  the photographer I wanted to become was different to the one I am now. PSC refined the vision I had for myself and my knowledge and inspirations broadened. I guess ultimately I hope the photographer I want to become constantly evolves and changes with time.
What has PSC taught you?
PSC has taught me so much, from technical aspects to information about the industry, It has really expanded my photographic knowledge. However the most beneficial thing PSC has given me is constant inspiration from the staff to push myself and my thinking.
What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I am working on a project called “The Pines” which documents a small town in Melbourne’s south-east. The town, once a pine plantation is now a community struggling to get by. A prevalent culture of drugs, violence and socioeconomic status cause harsh realities to be prominent. The work deals with ideas of escapism and struggling Australian sub culture and will be presented in book form at the end of the year. See Work In Progress 
What do you do when you are not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photos I like to play music or get outside and go camping. I’m normally taking photos though, or looking at them at least.
Do you have a dream job/shoot? 
Not really, my dream clients would be Time, The New York Times and The Guardian, as well as publications such as Aint-Bad and British Journal of Photography.
To see more of James’ work, follow him on Instagram, or take a look at his website.

2017 Graduate Feature; Rachel Hickey

To kick off our last week of graduate features, we’re catching up with photojournalist Rachel Hickey to hear more abut her time at PSC.

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Hey Rachel, what got you started in photography?
I’m not sure if there was a particular moment that inspired me… But I realised photography was a part of me when I wore out my first camera, a point and shoot Olympus. I was obsessed with images, always trying to get a different perspective and do something different. Actually, I remember the first ever photography job I did was on that little camera; it was at our local racecourse, photographing the horse racing. I had no idea what I was doing, but running from place to place and meeting new people was incredibly exciting and at the end of the day, to have a story of the events and little details that so many people would have missed was really an honour.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 
Ha! I was convinced that I would be a stills photographer for films. However I have never once been on a movie set.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
The worst someone can ever say is no.
I have learned to accept that no one sees the same thing in the exact same way, I have also learned to not be pressured by “should”. That is when people say “You should photograph like that” or “You should do that”.

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
 To be honest; going through a breakup three weeks before a folio was due when that was my subject matter, was possibly the most stressful.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Presenting my final folio and being genuinely proud of myself and the amount of dedication and persistence I put in to every single image. It was an overwhelming moment of emotion when I realised I had presented my last ever folio at PSC- huge accomplishment!
How has your style developed?
My style is always developing. It started with being very formally composed, but it’s now more focused on details of something to add insight to the larger picture, without actually showing the larger picture. I like to think it’s less biased in that sense.
What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio ‘Beyond Bikes’ is looking deep into the community of cycling, specifically track racing. I grew up around cycling and after moving to Melbourne, I noticed whenever I was talking to non-cycling friends about the velodrome and the thrill of riding that they didn’t have any idea of what I was going on about. I wanted to show that there is more to cycling than bikes.

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

What are you working on at the moment? 
I’m brainstorming ideas for new projects, but also taking some time away from the camera to broaden my eye. In saying that I am a part of the PSC Alumni in which we hope to have a group exhibition in the next couple of months. I’m also doing a bit of freelancing.
What advice would you give to current students?
Have a go! You are in the best environment to learn and make mistakes, don’t be concerned that anyone will ever think less of you because you don’t know everything about photography. Go ahead and make the mistakes.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I love to ride my bike! Either on the velodrome or on the road.
Where do you find your motivation?
From being around like-minded people, that is something I loved about PSC.
Who/what inspires you?
Looking at other photographers’ work and not limiting myself. Thinking about future possibilities is huge inspiration for me, it makes me look a little more internally to what I actually want to do.
What is your dream job/shoot?
I would love the opportunity to photograph a professional cycling race team for a season. I also dream of/plan on living in Europe or Canada and creating smaller bodies of work in my downtime.
To see more of Rachel’s work, check out her website! 

 

 

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

 

2017 Graduate Feature; Morgan Hancock

Today’s graduate feature is photojournalist Morgan Hancock who has taken up a position at The Standard; a fairfax newspaper delivering the latest news and events in Warrnambool and south-west Victoria. We asked him a few questions about his time at PSC and now working in the industry straight out of study.

Morgan Hancock, 2016

What got you started in photography?
I got started in photography during high school, I took it as an elective as I had always enjoyed taking photos, during the school year I quickly realised how much I loved photography, and the creative scope that it allowed for.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
When I first started at PSC, I imagined that I would become an all round better photographer. I had always enjoyed photographing sport so I wanted to see myself as a sport photographer, having completed my degree it made me a better photographer in every aspect.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
PSC taught me a lot of time management skills, as well as thinking outside of the box which is ultra important in the photography industry.

Morgan Hancock

 What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The most challenging moment at PSC would be the very beginning; I found it quite hard to get my head around all of the new aspects, including thinking of a folio, getting used to how PSC works and getting to know all of the new faces.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
The most rewarding part was right at the end, when it was possible to have a look at the folio that I had created in the final year, which was a culmination of hard work over the prior years.
How has your style developed?
My photographic style has developed into a lot more of a documentary style. When I first began, I had attempted to create documentary works, however at the end of the three years my style was certainly a lot clearer.
 What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was based around spending a year inside a football club; this came about from my huge passion for football, and the simple fact that it quite often isn’t documented in such a way.
What are you working on at the moment?
I am currently working at the Warrnambool Standard as a photographer, I am also working on some personal projects on the side; ranging from more sport photography work, to photographing abandoned sites.

Morgan Hancock

What advice would you give to current students?
I would tell them to enjoy the challenge, and make the most of being able to choose their own folio ideas.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photo’s there is a high chance that I will be off watching sport, or exploring a new place.
Where do you find your motivation?
I find motivation from constantly looking at other photographers work; I love spending time looking through world class photographers’ photos. Nothing motivates me more than flicking through a magazine or Instagram, and seeing images that I can have the opportunity to create.
Who/what inspires you?
I am mainly inspired by the dream that I can one day spend my time traveling and photographing sport, whilst creating jaw dropping images.
What is your dream job/shoot?
My long term goal has always been to work at a newspaper and/or an agency like Getty Images. My dream shoot would be the opportunity to cover the Olympic Games.
See more of Morgan’s work here on his website 

Morgan Hancock

2017 Graduate Feature; Bella Johnson

This week we are featuring photojournalist student Bella Johnson in the lead up to graduation on May 19th; only two weeks away-Yikes!

Bella Johnson, ‘Curious Eyes’, 2016

What got you started in photography?
In year 11 I stepped into a darkroom, got taught the process and handed a Pentax k1000, I couldn’t believe (and still don’t) how Magic the process is.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
I imagined I’d become a travel photographer.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
To trust your gut. It’s said a lot, but so true, especially to documentary photography.
What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The moments you question yourself and your practice.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Picking up my final project from the printers.
How has your style developed?
I still shoot 35mm colour film, I wont ever stop. But I’ve recently built a darkroom and am getting back into black and white photography. I shoot impulsively, it’s a feeling, not a thought, my style revolves around intimacy with moments.

What was your graduating folio about?
It was about youth. Capturing candid moments of intimacy. It was a diaristic approach to the world around me.
How did you arrive at this idea?
I found it really difficult choosing a folio theme, but trusted my gut, and shot what I was attracted to and what I was already shooting, my friends.
What are you working on at the moment?
Still the same body of work about youth, I don’t think it’ll end.

Bella Johnson, ‘Curious Eyes’, 2016

What advice would you give to current students?
Trust your gut.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I make art, I write lots, watch documentaries, listen to vinyl and drink gin.

Bella Johnson, ‘Curious Eyes’, 2016

Where do you find your motivation?
Art, the street, people, conversations, music, film, travel, just about everything.
Who/what inspires you?
People, the world.
What is your dream job/shoot?
Travel photography, to travel the world, meet people and capture intimate moments to show the rest of the world.
See Bella’s website for more of her work on ‘Curious Eyes’ 

2017 Graduate Feature; Zac Dorio

Our graduate being featured today is photojournalist and surfer Zac Dorio.

Zac Dorio, 2016

 

What got you started in photography?
I got started in photography when I first realised that I could capture a moment and keep it forever as an image, being able to capture that slice of time really got me thinking.

 

When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
When I first started at PSC I had NO idea what kind of photography genre I liked, what style or where I would see myself! I was just happy and open to try new things and experiment.

 

Zac Dorio, 2016 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
Through studying at PSC throughout the years I learned to be versatile in my work, be willing to try new things and step outside my comfort zone.

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
My most challenging moment at PSC was probably when I had to shoot fashion / editorial type of images, I had no experience in that field. It was tough but I came out with some really strong images.

 

What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
My most rewarding PSC moment was seeing my work printed at our end of year exhibition ‘Always Already’. To know where I had come from and how hard I had worked for that, seeing my work on the wall just made me realise how far I had come and how worth it it all was.

 

What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was about the ocean, the connection and interaction I have with the ocean via a passion of surfing and photography. I always enjoyed shooting surf and surf lifestyle, so I was automatically drawn to the sea. I wanted to document it in a way that was personal to me and also told a story and showed that connection.

 

Zac Dorio, 2016

 

What advice would you give to current students?
I would just say be passionate about what you do; always give 110% so that you know you gave it your very best. Push your boundaries and step outside your comfort zone

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I work in a busy little cafe making coffees, I surf and like to explore Victoria as much as possible .

 

What is your dream job/shoot?
My dream job is to work for a magazine / company following surfers around the world chasing adventures, good waves and good vibes.

 

To stay in the loop of what Zac is working on, follow him on Instagram.

 

Zac Dorio, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Ena Skaljic

With graduation now 5 weeks away, we want to introduce you to some of the students who are graduating in 2017.

First up is Ena Skaljic, a photojournalist student whose graduating folio was working with Moonlit Sanctuary Wildlife Conservation Park to to shine a light on the relationship between humans and animals.

 

Ena Skaljic, ‘Untitiled’, 2016

 

Hey Ena, why did you choose photography?
I have always been fascinated by photography, the camera itself got my attention when I was young and saw my mum through the lens thinking it was magic.

 

What was it like when you first started at PSC? Did you have an idea back then of what you wanted to be doing now?
Starting at PSC I had no idea about my aesthetic but I knew I loved science and nature so I focussed on that. I never had a set idea as far as commercial, art or photojournalism. I’m glad I came in open-minded cause I’m not sure if I’d produce the work I do now if I did otherwise.

Ena Skaljic, ‘Untitled’, 2016

 

Looking at the work you’re producing now, how would you describe your style?
My style is nothing like it was the first year, however it was a gradual growth. My aesthetic alone changed while in Malaysia during the OBSCURA festival with the support from Sarker Protick. Style in shooting has developed into confidence and based on instincts.

 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned in the last three years?
Personally the most beneficial thing I learned during my three years at PSC is support and finding confidence in my instincts. It is extremely important to have people to support you – I’m not talking about your parents who think all your photos are nice but friends, artists, teachers and mentors who aren’t afraid to tell your flaws and be honest. As far as instincts, I was focussed on pleasing the teaches and students showing them what I thought they would like, I eventually went on my instincts (subjects, timing, concepts) and that is when I produced my current aesthetic and subjects.

 

Did you have any challenges in that time?
The most challenging aspects at PSC was finding the confidence in my own work and not to feel intimidated by others but learn from them.

 

What would you suggest to current students?
I would encourage current students to take advantage of what PSC offers! You have the most talented and amazing teachers there for you, great studios and equipment at arms length, unlimited networks, all this and more that no other Uni or place can provide. Oh & have fun, take risks and get out of your comfort zone, that’s the prime time to do all that!

 

In taking risks, what was your final folio on?
My final folio was focussed on the human, animal relationship by documenting Moonlit Sanctuary’s conservation work and animals. I knew I wanted to work with wildlife, after lots of research I knew I wanted to base it on Australia’s wildlife and the limbo they are in between surviving and extinction.

 

Ena Skaljic, ‘Untitled’, 2016

 

So you’re quite passionate about animals, where do you get your motivation from?
My passion for what I am shooting drives me. Inspiration-wise of course it is from fellow students, teachers, other artists of all mediums but also from nature as cliché as it sounds. I like to observe movement, lights and shadows that alone can inspire me completely.

 

What are you working on at the moment?
Right now I am getting into contact with The Save the Tasmanian Devil Program in hopes of working alongside them and documenting their incredible work.

 

That’s awesome! Do you have a dream job/shoot that you would love to do?
I would absolutely love to keep working on wildlife, mainly within Australia as there’s a huge gap that needs to be filled in order to raise awareness and create a change.

 

See more of Ena’s work here on her website

 

Ena Skaljic, ‘Untitled’, 2016