Mid Year Exhibition review

With a range of stunning work, our students have brought together family history, environmental issues, sports, fashion, and an array of people with stories so unique they often slip under the radar. Created by students in the Bachelor of Photography course, Advanced Diploma of Photography course, and the Pathway Program, our mid year exhibition is an amazing showcase of our talented and passionate students. Visit the college to see even more work!

 

James Thorn is a final year Bachelor of Photography student, majoring in commercial photography. James’ series ‘Found” is a photographic exploration of the life of a gold prospector, shot in a non-traditional documentary method, the series is an abstracted look at the average day of a prospector. Recently James was awarded a silver with distinction from the AIPP for his abstract work. Go to his website to see more of his diverse skill set or follow him on Instagram.

 

“Seeing Ourselves” is a series of introspective biographical portraits of women for women, which explores with playfulness and irony what it means and feels like to identify as  ‘woman’ and a ‘creative’, in the face of the ever-present ‘culture of domesticity’. Juliana Rudewych is a current Advanced Diploma of Photography student, she seeks to reveal the similarities and differences in the challenges and experiences faced by women today. Follow Juliana on Instagram 

 

 

Advanced Diploma of Photography student Luke Rush has centred his final year folio around the use of denim and sex appeal in fashion. Inspired by Beyonce’s Lemonade film (6 Inch Heels) Luke has utilised his skills in studio lighting to create a story line around his subject being hysterical from the isolation of the apartment in which the photographs are taken. Earlier this year Luke won his second silver award at the APPAs, read more about Luke’s practice here, or follow him on Instagram.

 

 

Second year Bachelor of Photography student Noah Thompson has once again created a wonderful example of his documentary skills by photographing the community of people who race pigeons in Victoria; “My desire (is) to create a documentary series around a small community of people who share in the same passion, while exploring individual personalities and stories”. With the approach of giving the subjects involved the appropriate level of respect, Noah has stepped back and allowed the viewers to draw their own conclusions about the sport and people involved. Read more about what else Noah got up to in 2017, or follow him on Instagram.

 

 

 

In June 2017, Ruby Henshall completed the pathway program to receive a Bachelor in Photography, following on from five years earlier when she graduated from our Advanced Diploma of photography. After making the decision to undertake a degree in photography, Ruby came back to PSC after working as a commercial photographer to work on a more personal, fine art project; in doing so she created “Re-Wild”. The series explores the complexities of nature and challenges the notion of ‘wild’, it examines how nature is capable of existing in forgotten landscapes called novel eco-systems, reclaiming and re wilding out of sight of humans. To see more of Ruby’s work, follow her on Instagram.

Feature Friday 20th October 2017; Clare Delaney

This week we caught up with Advanced Diploma of Photography student Clare Delaney to learn about her journey here at PSC.

 

Clare Delaney, 2017

 

What got you started in photography?

The earliest memory I have with photography is watching my father take photos on his Pentax K1000 in Lorne of waves crashing on the shoreline. I was around ten years old and was so fascinated. My dad wrapped his camera around my neck, taught me what he knew and said, “Now, go ahead, shoot.” Let’s just say it has been love ever since.

When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become? 

I have always been the artistic type across a range of different mediums, so being an artist was always the end game for me. Art and free fluid creativity have always been the most interesting aspects of photography that I have connected to the most. At one point though, I was really interested in photojournalism. I found the idea of travelling and being a sort of detective was the appeal.

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point? 

In terms of photography, I would say is understanding light and analysing it in your own work. Lighting and studio classes at PSC really have taught me the most. You can never stop learning and applying different lighting techniques to your photos to make them sing. In terms of life, the most beneficial thing I have learnt is to be willing to take risks.

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?

I would say the most challenging moment so far is really just beginning the final semester of my course. Knowing I only have a short time left at PSC is both daunting and exciting. I hope to take up every opportunity I can to push myself for the last part of the year. 

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?

In all honesty, I can’t choose a moment, I feel like it’s more of an overall feeling. I would say being surrounded in a creative environment and creative people. You are nurtured and it has allowed me to grow into the kind of creative person I have always inspired to be. The tutors are pretty amazing as well. The knowledge and passion they have to offer are so invaluable.

How has your style developed? What have you noticed is different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach? 

Good question! I have always been fascinated by things that are dark, things of fantasy and dangerous things. I feel there is a true beauty in these things and the sublime. The more I learn, the more I find myself being in tune with this side of me. Instead of holding back, I am opening up and embracing all things that I am drawn to create. I think that that is the key, being in tune with who you are and always learning, researching and changing.

So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?

My folio from second year is work I have been most proud of. The purpose of the series was to raise awareness around mental illness and suicide. I feel the series holds an important message; you are not alone in your fight. I want to make a difference with my photography however that may be. I feel this body of work was my first step in doing so. I hope to continue work with this concept in the future.

What are you working on at the moment? 

Currently, I am working on a series relating to mortality. After death, we leave behind our story — the essence of who we are — in pages of diaries, the stories told by loved ones and the photographs taken.

Clare Delaney, 2017

 

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?

I try to maintain a social life and a work balance while studying. In my spare time, you can find me swimming, going to healthy alternative expos, training my Rottweiler for dog shows or watching Netflix. I am a bit of film buff too.

Where do you find your motivation?

My fire is what motivates me. I am an incredibly self-driven and passionate person. When I want to achieve something, there is no holding me back. Also, my family, they are great motivators and the biggest fan club.

Who/what inspires you?

I am inspired by my experiences, nature and dark gothic literature. Artists and photographers who inspire me are Van Gogh, Picasso, Jane Burton, Bill Henson and Yervant Zanazanian. There are so many others but those are the most significant. 

What is your dream job/shoot?

I had this actual dream once that I was taking a fashion editorial shoot for Vogue Magazine with Emma Stone and Johnny Depp. It was full on and the sassiest thing I had ever seen. That was a pretty cool dream… One day soon, I hope it becomes a reality, haha! I would also love to exhibit both in Australia and overseas. I can see myself living the artist dream, travelling and making a difference in society through my art in the future.

 

 

To see more of Clare’s work, follow her on Instagram 

 

 

Clare Delaney, 2017

Feature Friday 22 September 2017; Leah Mitchell

Today we are featuring final year Advanced Diploma of Photography student Leah Mitchell who is one of our many mature-age students. Leah’s work has recently been picked up by Nude by Nature as she continues to experiment with studio lighting and product photography.

 

Leah Mitchell, 2017

 

What got you started in photography?
From a young age I would save up my pocket money, buy Kodak disposable cameras and take photos of my pets and friends. So the love of photography has always been there. I was a dancer for 18 years, so I was always in front of the camera but now I love being behind the camera.

When you started at PSC did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you wanted to become?
When I started at PSC, my dream job was to become a National Geographic photographer.

What is the most beneficial; thing you have learned up to this point?
If your heart is not in it, it will show in your work.

What has been your most challenging moment so far?
Most challenging moment would have to be my first folio presentation as I used to a have a fear of public speaking.

What about your most rewarding moment?
My most rewarding moment at PSC so far would have to be seeing my short film at the PSC Cinema night and then seeing it used for advertising of the Social Media course.

How has your style developed?
I feel my style has a commercial feel to it now, I do a lot of portraits and still life.

What is the body of work you are most proud of?
The body of work that I am most proud of is my still life series called ‘Seven Deadly Sins’ which was my folio for trimester 3.

Leah Mitchell, Seven Deadly Sins, 2017

 

What are you working on at the moment?
I recently did a Korean Fashion Shoot which was a collaboration with another photographer for MiranDay Designs. At the moment I have picked up a couple of jobs; I did my first newborn photo shoot, and also have a few family portraits lined up. For my final semester, I am working on a makeup folio inspired by the Wizard of Oz. I’ve actually got my own little studio in the garage at the moment that I’ve using to play with my still life work.

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I am not taking photo’s you would find me in a shopping centre buying new products to shoot.

Where does your motivation come from?
My motivation comes from my passion and love of photography. I could not imagine doing anything else in my life.

What is your dream job?
My dream job is to be a fashion photographer and to see my work on the front cover of a magazine.

 

Leah Mitchell, 2017

To see more of Leah’s work, follow her on Instagram.

Feature Friday 8th September 2017; Luke Rush

Now in his final year of the Advanced Diploma of Photography, we caught up with one of our talented commercial students Luke Rush who recently won his second silver award from the AIPP.

 

 

Luke Rush, Untitled Nude

What got you started in photography?
I’ve always been interested in art and decided to leave high school after year 11 and instead studied a cert 4 in visual arts. I’d always taken photos but after a semester of studying the history of photography I thought it sounded like a great career. If I’m honest, I’m not that great of a drawer.

When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
I’d say it would have been in the second semester of first year when I started shooting fashion just with some friends. I put together a team with a makeup artist, stylist, and my friend modelled for me. After that I loved meeting new people and working with other creatives, so I decided I wanted to be a portrait/ fashion photographer.

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
The most beneficial thing I’ve learned about photography and life is not to force things. Whether that’s in organising shoots, planning folios or just general day-to-day, everything will eventually come together if you work at it and let it happen.

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Most challenging moment at PSC so far is always folio season.

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
The most rewarding moment I’ve had at PSC was having my work up on the wall for the first time. I was so excited to finally make the wall, which was a goal from as soon as I started here. And it still is!

Luke Rush, 2017

How has your style developed?
I don’t yet know if I have a particular style. Aesthetically I try to differentiate the style in each shoot. I like having even skin tones and rich blacks in all my work. I tend to work best by improvising rather than planning. I find that if I plan shoot to the t I tend to overthink everything on the day and it never goes to plan. Photography is after all about problem solving.

So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
The work I’m most proud of would have to be my untitled nude series. The series was shot digitally but I processed the images to look like film and then I inverted them to black and white. The idea behind the series was to photograph parts of a women’s body in abstract ways so that some are deceiving at first glance but still recognisable.

What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I’m working on shooting for my book for my final folio. The focus of the book is really just to showcase the quality of work I have learnt to produce in my time at PSC. The theme of the book is to revolve around skin and flesh.

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photos I’m editing them. But aside from photography I am a swim instructor and lifeguard.

Where do you find your motivation?
I find a lot of my motivation in the people around me. I also find a lot of motivation out of my own passion for photography and the goals that I have for myself.

Who/what inspires you?
I find a lot of inspiration in music videos and movies I watch. In combination with work I see through social media and the internet. At the moment I’m finding a lot of inspiration in Peter Coulson and Jo Duck‘s work. They are vastly different in style and aesthetic, but both get great responses out of the people they work with and I simply just love their work.

What is your dream job/shoot?
My dream job is to work for a major magazine or fashion label, ’till then I hope to work freelance. I’m also in the process of starting up my own portrait business.

 

Luke Rush, Red, 2017

 

To see more of Luke’s work, check out his website or follow him on Instagram.

Feature Friday 25th August 2017; Anne McCallum

Our feature story today is on Advanced Diploma of Photography student Anne McCallum who journeyed to Zambia in June to help promote conservation of wildlife. We sat down with Anne to speak about her experience.

Anne McCallum, 2017

How did you come to be involved in this trip?
Last year, my daughter and her friend came up with the idea to head to Zambia to make a short film about the Chipembele Wildlife Education Trust (CWET). My daughter’s friend had been to Zambia with a school group about 4 years ago and was telling my daughter about the experience. This organisation runs groups within schools and into the communities promoting conservation.
I became involved when my daughter got a job in Iceland and couldn’t get time off to go to Zambia. The girls asked me if I would like to be involved and be part of the team.
Can you tell us about your experience?
What an amazing experience!   This was my first trip to Zambia, actually my first trip to Africa!  We travelled to a town called Mfuwe, which is right on the edge of the South Luangwa National Park.  This is one of the best National parks in Africa as it always has water – there are several natural springs, so the animals can live there all year round without having to do massive migrations to follow water.    Consequently there is a huge range and population of many animals species. Due to this there is a blossoming tourist industry which creates employment for the local people, however this leads to the need for education about caring for their environment and living sustainably (to keep the animals safe and encourage eco-friendly tourism). This is where CWET comes into play with their education and community programmes. The aim of the video is to show CWET at work and the importance of their contribution.
Some of the best moments while in Zambia, included the opportunity to actually go on drives into the National Park and see the animals in their natural environment. My biggest thrill would have to be seeing 3 leopards in one morning. We also had the joy of seeing giraffes and elephants just wandering by the side of the road, and one night we actually had a hippo in the garden of our lodge. Of course there are lots of vervet monkeys and baboons, if you happen to leave your room door unlocked they do like to get in and investigate everything. There is a now a monkey roaming around with a nice tinted moisturiser – not sure if it is the right colour for her.

Anne McCallum, 2017

What was it like getting an insight into the local culture? 
The local people are absolutely charming and so welcoming and the children extremely adorable and happy. Education is considered very important, but it is not always easy as both uniform and books have to be paid for and they are not always affordable. Another problem is that the children cannot move to the next grade without completing the current one. Some years they can’t afford to go to school so the classes end up being multi age groups which they all find quite acceptable and normal. Any student wishing to further their studies can’t do so without sponsorship.
In reflecting on your trip since you arrived back home, have you noticed a change in your perception? 
This was an amazing opportunity for me and I feel that I have gained insight into their community. I think the biggest question is how do we as a developed nation help a developing nation to develop, without making all the mistakes that we have made?? How can they skip the pollution problems, the diet and health problems and the conservation problems?
We hope that our video and photographs will help provide an insight into this community and maybe help solve some of the problems.
I would definitely love to be involved in other projects along this line!

‘Children playing with motion sensors for animals’, Anne McCallum, 2017

Feature Friday 18th August 2017; Melissa Cachia

With quite a number of PSC students, past and present exhibiting at the Ballarat International Foto Biennale this year, we thought we would take a closer look at their work. Featured today, Friday the 18th of August is stage 2 Advanced Diploma of Photography student Melissa Cachia who will be having a solo exhibition titled ‘Frozen Flowers’ at The Elephant Patch (location) opening Saturday August 19th at 3pm.

Melissa Cachia, Frozen Flowers

 

 

Why did you decide to present this work?  
After a few inquiries, interest & sales of my frozen flowers series I decided that this was a good enough incentive to get them from the computer screen to print for exhibitions.
What got you started in photography?
I have always loved Photography, my late father & his partner were keen photographers  so after his passing I decided to take it further!
When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
I love documenting events, exploring regional towns & markets, showcasing what they have to offer.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point? 
 Life is short. If you have a passion or interest-go for it  It is the best therapy.
What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
The Digi lab!!! Im still at layering the pizza stage!!lol
What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
Way too many to mention, meeting so many talented artists, the friendships that have been made, the tutors & the expertise they bring to class, just to name a few!
How has your style developed? 
Thinking outside the square in terms of  Photography, 2nd year has pushed me beyond just taking a “photo” it’s the image, processing & printing that I take into account now, how I want my audience to feel. Evoke emotions
So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
Frozen Flowers, Yr2 Semester 1, This was a product of exploring my creative side encouraged by my tutor.
What are you working on at the moment?
My industry folio & personal expression folio
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
Go to work (nursing) cooking, “thinking about my folio”, photography workshops!
Where do you find your motivation?
Not sure, I surprise myself most days lol
Who/what inspires you?
Many people inspire me, but mainly people who just get out there & pursues their dreams regardless of age & or capabilities!
What is your dream job/shoot?
To one day own a home studio & do freelance work. Did I mention a café/ gallery!!
Remember to head along to the festival-opening tomorrow- to see more work by other PSC students, including Kathryn Vinella and Sean Mc Donald’s exhibition , Sharon Hughes, Stella Nguyen, Marie Watt, Project 17 Collective, Todd Walker, Ian Kemp, and the PSC Alumni.

Melissa Cachia, Frozen Flowers

Feature Friday 4th August 2017; Kadek Thatcher

For Friday August 4th, we are featuring final year Advanced Diploma Photojournalist major Kadek Thatcher.

Kadek Thatcher

How did you get into photography?
Well I originally wanted to be an actress but mum told me I wasn’t going to step out of high school and be in Hollywood, so I picked up the camera in year 10 and have never looked back.
Did you have any plans of what sort of photography you wanted to get into? 
When I started I knew I needed to learn my camera and the basics of photography back to front before I really thought about what I wanted to do but also always knew I wanted to do sport photography particularly AFL.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned in your time at PSC?
Probably networking and experience are definitely the main things I have learnt in life and photography. As well as do something that you love and not what someone else would want you to do.
Have you had any challenging moments? 
My most challenging moment would be stepping out of my comfort zone. I am not one to go well with directing people when doing studio shoots but have learnt a lot through the past 3 years at PSC to overcome and be the master of the camera.
What about rewarding moments?
 Most rewarding moment would be seeing my photography improve each time I shoot. Knowing that I have come so far since starting has been amazing to see.

Kadek Thatcher

Have you noticed a development in your style of shooting?
Well before PSC I didn’t really do much sport and I used Auto, which let’s just say was not a proud moment. Now using Manual, and over the years at PSC I have seen that through shooting each week for footy, I try to be different and capture moments that people may miss in the games as well as trying to make them look different and stand out from the usual footy photos you see. I am still learning and experimenting each week.

Do you have a body of work you are most proud of?
Can I say my football photos? All of them. Especially really starting to get into it last year and being able to volunteer with AFL Victoria and seeing my work out there makes me so proud. But also getting to shoot the first season of TAC Cup Girls was a proud moment to be a part of that history making competition.
Are you working on anything right now?
At the moment, I am photographing each weekend for AFL Victoria, shooting VFL and VFLW.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
Literally shooting every weekend but pretty much going to the AFL. I am a massive Hawthorn supporter, watching Netflix like any student would be and hanging out with my two dogs.
Where do you find your motivation?
 I find my motivation with seeing my work being out there on the AFL Victoria website or VFL website and their social media pages. Knowing that my work is out there makes me feel motivated to know where I could be in the next few years.
Who/what inspires you?
I am inspired by everyone in my class everyday. Seeing their work being improved from 1st year to now is amazing. As well as AFL Photographers, I absolutely love seeing their photos each week from the weekend’s games. Also my mentor Darrian Traynor, a past student of PSC; his work in AFL/Sport and Photojournalism is why I wanted him as my mentor.
What is your dream job/shoot?
My dream is to be working for the AFL as a photographer and even for an AFL club as a photographer for them. That is the main goal for me.
 To stay up to date with Kadek, follow her on Instagram 

Kadek Thatcher

Feature Friday 28th July 2017: Kayla De Saint Aromain

Friday July 28th is featuring Advanced Diploma of Photography student Kayla De Saint Aromain.

Kayla De Saint Aromain

What got you started in Photography? 
 I got started early high school after participating in an end-of-year activity where I quickly fell in love!
When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
Initially I wanted to work with nature, maybe a National Geographic photographer! That’s totally changed haha
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
I’ve learned how to live my dreams
What has been the most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Deadlines and essays are always challenging for me. Recently, entering the VPPYs and finding a mentor was very difficult!
How has your style developed?
I’ve learned a lot about myself and my art, which I really value. Everything has changed for the better! I feel like I can see now! My style has become more purposeful and an actual style is developing.
So far, what body of work have you been most proud of’?
My last folio, about toxisity in the makeup industry, is probably the work im most proud of. It’s still not something I’m super proud of, but as a body of work it’s had the most success.

Kayla De Saint Aromain

What are you working on at the moment? 
I’m currently working on my folio, about the use and positive effect of tarot. I’m really honing my skills and style on this one so I’m really enjoying it.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
In my spare time, if I’m not watching dribble on the tv, I like to sew costumes and my own clothes.
Where do you find your motivation?
Currently, deadlines are a pretty solid motavation. But I find it easiest to do work when I have a clear idea of what I’m doing. Rethinking about my passion and dreams really helps too.
Who/what inspires you?
Francesca Woodman, Sarah Moon and Bill Henson are huge inspirations for my current work.
What is your dream job?
My dream job is to be working on the streets of Japan, shooting street fashion. But I’d also love to be able to embrace personal work and hold exhibitions!
To stay up to date with Kayla’s work, follow her on Instagram

Kayla De Saint Aromain

Feature Friday 30th June 2017; Shannon Ogrizek

Today we catch up with level 5 Advanced Diploma of Photography student Shannon Ogrizek

Shannon Ogrizek

 
What got you started in photography?
I love taking photos and wanted to learn how some of the famous photographers created their photos, but also I wanted to do it because there are endless possibilities and ideas on how to create images.

When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
I had no idea what kind of photographer I wanted to become, I just really wanted to create my images, express my emotions and feelings through my images, as well as create images that I would love. I also really enjoy making images for clients; I like going through the process with clients seeing what they want, progression through that and then the final result. I’m a photographer of everything, I never turn down a job or an idea I’ll always give it a go, it doesn’t matter if it’s completely different to what I have done previously.

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
Most beneficial would have been to just create images that you want to create, create images that you will be proud of and happy with at the end of the day.

 

Shannon Ogrizek

 

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Finding ideas for folio work and pushing those each and every shoot to get a magnificent photo and have it be something that I’m proud of, knowing I worked hard for.

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
Most rewarding moment at PSC is always end of year finals, seeing my hard work and effort go into my folios every trimester and being able to see the final result at the end of it is just a really rewarding experience for me.

So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
My most proud body of work I have made was my movement images and my domestic violence posters that went up around Melbourne.

 

Shannon Ogrizek

 

What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I’m working on a body of images that is of the natural world, but incorporating slow shutter speeds with that. However I’m just constantly shooting with models and products, being active with my photography.

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
If I’m not taking photos I’m usually on Instagram getting inspiration for a shoot I’d like to do in the near future.

Where do you find your motivation?
I find my motivation from other photographers work, being given encouragement and feedback.

Who/what inspires you?
There’s so many photographers that I’d like to talk about for this particular question but I really love Lindsay Adler and her work. A few Melbourne photographers, in particular a friend of mine Andy Swann, as well as scrolling through Instagram.

What is your dream job/shoot?

I really do love taking portraits/football photos/weddings and debutantes as well as landscapes/light trails, really anything that’s fashion or has animals.

 

To see more of Shannon’s work, like her Facebook page.

Shannon Ogrizek

 

Feature Friday 23rd June 2017; Anthony Mayze

The Australian Professional Photography Awards are coming up, which means our students are now preparing their state award-winning images for the national competition.

One such student is Anthony Mayze who studies the Advanced Diploma of Photography. Now with an incredible achievement of three silver awards, Anthony sat down to have a quick chat about his journey so far at PSC.

 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

 

Where did your interest in photography start? 
I joined studio arts in high-school which led me to focus on seascape photography as well as some astrophotography and I grew my love from there.
Back when you started at PSC, did you have an idea of what sort of photographer you wanted to become?
I had no idea where I wanted my photography to lead me, but always thought that I would alway choose a commercial path.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
The most beneficial lesson in life is; what ever you put in, you get out, so always try your hardest. Photographic-wise would have to be learning to project emotions and personality into my work.
What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
 My most challenging moment at PSC would have to be the folios; having a short time to execute everything and then to present it was rather difficult but I have always managed to prevail!
What about your most rewarding moment so far? 
My most rewarding moment would have to be when I won a silver award in the VIPPY awards.
How has your style changed? Have you noticed anything different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach?
I have noticed that I am putting more consciousness behind my images in terms of looking out for distractions, as well as looking at ways to put my own twist on images. I have also realised that I love simplicity in my work.
So far, what body of work are you most proud of?
My trimester 4 folio on personal experiences with stress, frustration and sadness.

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

What are you working on now?
 I’m about to start working on building from my ‘Stress, Frustration and Sadness’ concept with editorial fashion techniques.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photos I’m either working, spending too much money with friends or watching Netflix.
Where do you find your motivation?
 I find my motivation everywhere, whether it be a film or in life I can always find ways that sparks my imagination.
What or who inspires you?
Two major inspirations in the photographic world are Annie Leibovitz and Gregory Crewdson, their work is amazing. Another huge inspiration is my Nan who always wished for me to hold on to my dreams until I have achieved them
What is your dream job?
Ever since starting my journey in photography, my dream shoot has always been to recreate scenes from Beauty and the Beast with a Gregory Crewdson style.
 To stay up-to-date with Anthonys work, follow him on Instagram! 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)