Feature Friday 30th June 2017; Shannon Ogrizek

Today we catch up with level 5 Advanced Diploma of Photography student Shannon Ogrizek

Shannon Ogrizek

 
What got you started in photography?
I love taking photos and wanted to learn how some of the famous photographers created their photos, but also I wanted to do it because there are endless possibilities and ideas on how to create images.

When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
I had no idea what kind of photographer I wanted to become, I just really wanted to create my images, express my emotions and feelings through my images, as well as create images that I would love. I also really enjoy making images for clients; I like going through the process with clients seeing what they want, progression through that and then the final result. I’m a photographer of everything, I never turn down a job or an idea I’ll always give it a go, it doesn’t matter if it’s completely different to what I have done previously.

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
Most beneficial would have been to just create images that you want to create, create images that you will be proud of and happy with at the end of the day.

 

Shannon Ogrizek

 

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Finding ideas for folio work and pushing those each and every shoot to get a magnificent photo and have it be something that I’m proud of, knowing I worked hard for.

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
Most rewarding moment at PSC is always end of year finals, seeing my hard work and effort go into my folios every trimester and being able to see the final result at the end of it is just a really rewarding experience for me.

So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
My most proud body of work I have made was my movement images and my domestic violence posters that went up around Melbourne.

 

Shannon Ogrizek

 

What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I’m working on a body of images that is of the natural world, but incorporating slow shutter speeds with that. However I’m just constantly shooting with models and products, being active with my photography.

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
If I’m not taking photos I’m usually on Instagram getting inspiration for a shoot I’d like to do in the near future.

Where do you find your motivation?
I find my motivation from other photographers work, being given encouragement and feedback.

Who/what inspires you?
There’s so many photographers that I’d like to talk about for this particular question but I really love Lindsay Adler and her work. A few Melbourne photographers, in particular a friend of mine Andy Swann, as well as scrolling through Instagram.

What is your dream job/shoot?

I really do love taking portraits/football photos/weddings and debutantes as well as landscapes/light trails, really anything that’s fashion or has animals.

 

To see more of Shannon’s work, like her Facebook page.

Shannon Ogrizek

 

Feature Friday 23rd June 2017; Anthony Mayze

The Australian Professional Photography Awards are coming up, which means our students are now preparing their state award-winning images for the national competition.

One such student is Anthony Mayze who studies the Advanced Diploma of Photography. Now with an incredible achievement of three silver awards, Anthony sat down to have a quick chat about his journey so far at PSC.

 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

 

Where did your interest in photography start? 
I joined studio arts in high-school which led me to focus on seascape photography as well as some astrophotography and I grew my love from there.
Back when you started at PSC, did you have an idea of what sort of photographer you wanted to become?
I had no idea where I wanted my photography to lead me, but always thought that I would alway choose a commercial path.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
The most beneficial lesson in life is; what ever you put in, you get out, so always try your hardest. Photographic-wise would have to be learning to project emotions and personality into my work.
What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
 My most challenging moment at PSC would have to be the folios; having a short time to execute everything and then to present it was rather difficult but I have always managed to prevail!
What about your most rewarding moment so far? 
My most rewarding moment would have to be when I won a silver award in the VIPPY awards.
How has your style changed? Have you noticed anything different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach?
I have noticed that I am putting more consciousness behind my images in terms of looking out for distractions, as well as looking at ways to put my own twist on images. I have also realised that I love simplicity in my work.
So far, what body of work are you most proud of?
My trimester 4 folio on personal experiences with stress, frustration and sadness.

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

What are you working on now?
 I’m about to start working on building from my ‘Stress, Frustration and Sadness’ concept with editorial fashion techniques.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photos I’m either working, spending too much money with friends or watching Netflix.
Where do you find your motivation?
 I find my motivation everywhere, whether it be a film or in life I can always find ways that sparks my imagination.
What or who inspires you?
Two major inspirations in the photographic world are Annie Leibovitz and Gregory Crewdson, their work is amazing. Another huge inspiration is my Nan who always wished for me to hold on to my dreams until I have achieved them
What is your dream job?
Ever since starting my journey in photography, my dream shoot has always been to recreate scenes from Beauty and the Beast with a Gregory Crewdson style.
 To stay up-to-date with Anthonys work, follow him on Instagram! 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

Feature Friday 16th June 2017; Emily Skelton

Currently in her second-last semester at PSC, Advanced Diploma of Photography student Emily Skelton is already setting up her career; working with her local football club, as well as becoming a well-known figure around her hometown of Bacchus Marsh.

We caught up with Emily to learn more about her journey so far.

 

 

Emily Skelton

 

 

 

When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 

At the end of year 12 and the start of PSC I had this idea of being a famous fashion photographer, the one who takes incredible Vogue cover shots. I wanted to control the day, the shoot and get all creative, but as I started to learn at PSC it was becoming harder for me to see that for myself. My ideas started to change, I still wanted to do really creative things, but I wanted to be able to capture moments people would have for a lifetime.

 

What got you started in photography?

My mum and dad handing me a 35mm camera at the age of 2. That’s how it started, taking photos for mum and dad when they wanted to be in the picture. Mum has a particular photo in an album at home of herself and my sister, under the photo the caption says “photo by Emily”; I was 2.
I was never was really good at English and Math at school, so art was always my favourite subject. I was a very good painter, but I realise now that whenever we went out I would end up with the camera in my hands and I would be taking photos of everything from the ground, to the plants, to my family. Then as I got older I wanted to do more, so I would plan out photoshoots and get my friends to model for me. I still remember the first photoshoot I did; I borrowed a Canon camera off a friend, I pinned a white sheet up in my grandmothers granny flat with my friends in front of it wearing white t-shirts. We had bright-coloured paint and used it to paint my friends hands, then print it onto their face. I loved it and that for me was the beginning of everything, but I wanted more.

 

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC?

Not that I’m big on grades and all, but receiving a mark which I didn’t think I would get really showed me that if I push myself more I can truly achieve what I want. Being a part of open days and career expos has also been really rewarding too, as I can tell people my story and my experience here, as well as being able to meet potential students and make new friends.

 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned? 

Before I came to PSC I was self-taught; I shot jpegs in my backyard on a little Sony camera. I have benefited  from everything; starting with the basic stuff in first-year, to all the studio set-up now. I have learned how to capture an image with the correct light and what angles to shoot from, I have learned how to use my camera and control it so I can get the very best out of images. If you had told my high-school self this, I would not have believed you at all. This course and school has changed me for the better, I have grown so much in my work and myself and I have truly found something I love.

 

 

Emily Skelton

 

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?

Everything has been challenging in its own way and of course some things will be harder than others, some things take more time to learn, or sometimes you don’t have an idea and you have to work with what you’ve got and go for it.

 

What are you working on at the moment? 

At the moment I’m working on lots! I’m shooting every Saturday for the Bacchus Marsh Cobras (local footy club) which is a thing I keep growing and manage to get a new angle every week. I’m also working on building up my clients by shooting a few weddings. I have done a few jobs that have been printed onto glass and have now been installed into peoples new kitchens. I am always working on the next creative shoot I could be doing. It’s a good thing I have two sisters; one that wants to be a special effects makeup-artist, and the other who wants to be model. We are always coming up with new ideas and things we can work on together.

 

Where do you find your motivation?

Myself, and my life which includes my family and friends, as well as any events that happen.

 

Emily Skelton

 

Where do you want to take your photography?

Everywhere! I want to take it from within my hometown to overseas. I want to create or capture moments. As long as I’m creating and exploring the world with my camera; I’ll be happy. I want my photos to help people remember their moments in life because if you have an image, you know you’re not going to forget it.

 

Who/what inspires you?

Everything inspires me; I draw elements of life events into my work, from random creative ideas that happen to personal things that have happened. Watching movies also give me ideas as does the music I listen to.

 

How has your style developed?

Well my style has developed from shooting with natural light, with a white sheet in my backyard (which I still do) to setting up studio lights and controlling everything. My style has grown with me and we both have changed over the years as I try to find myself and where I belong in the photography world.

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?

I’m either at my local cafe with friends drinking coffee, or I’m at home sleeping, but sometimes I work with my dad.

 

What advice would you give to current students?

You can make it! Keep pushing and build up your foilo, believe in yourself and just keep working hard because hard work can get you anywhere.

 

 

 

To keep up to date with Emily, follow her on Instagram 

 

Emily Skelton

Feature Friday 9th June 2017; Anna Salzmann

Today’s student feature is on Anna Salzmann, a current Level 5 Advanced Diploma student at PSC. Earlier this year Anna received a silver award at the AIPP Epson State Awards for her series ‘Sei Bellissima’.

 

Anna Salzmann, ‘Sei Bellissima’

 

What got you started in photography?
My first memory of loving photography was when my uncle who is a photographer in Geneva, Switzerland, introduced me to the world of photography and I have been obsessed ever since. A year ago he invited me to join him and 18 other photographers from across the world (most based in Geneva) to be apart of their ‘Une photo par jour’ blog where we upload a photo per day.
When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become? 
All I knew is that I wanted to travel and work with other creatives doing great things, and I hoped that photography would give me these opportunities.

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
That planning and research is your friend!

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Probably this semester, knowing that I now only have 1 more semester in this college surrounded by so much support is hard, and I am trying to soak it up as much as I can!

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
Presenting my work at the end of each Semester is always great, I love seeing peoples reactions and hearing their thoughts on my work, whether it’s praise or critique.

 

 

Anna Salzmann, ‘Sei Bellissima’

 
How has your style developed?
My style is always changing and it is interesting to see my work from 2 years ago to now. It has changed a lot in regards to technique and colour, however the content has stayed similar.

So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
My ‘Sei Bellissima’ series where I documented the life of my Nonna Franca in stills as well as a short film. You can read my experience photographing her in my class’s upcoming magazine XPSD.

What are you working on at the moment? 
My mid Year Folio, I have been focusing on developing my portrait skills and have been photographing my friends and family.

Where do you find your motivation?
A lot of my motivation comes from the support of my family. They see my passion and hard work and keep me determined in creating a successful life for myself with photography.

What is your dream job/shoot?
I would love to find work with a publication of some sorts. Or anything that takes me travelling and includes working with a great team, I love the idea of working with others and photographing new and different locations.

 

To see more of Anna’s work, check out her Behance or Instagram 

 

 

 

Anna Salzmann, ‘Sei Bellissima’

Feature Friday 2nd June 2017; Jules Perrenot

Remember this name; Jules Perrenot, we don’t doubt you’ll be hearing it quite a bit over the next few years. Jules is a current first year student here at PSC, and before he has even presented his first semester folio he is already 1 of 40 international photographers to have won a spot in the Los Angeles Centre for Digital Art Top 40 exhibition. 

 

Outstanding Jules!!

We caught up with Jules to ask him about his relation to photography.

 

Jules Perrenot, 2017

 

Hey Jules, you’re in your first year at PSC; how did you come to be interested in photography?

 I can remember a few photographs that have stuck around in my mind, from Ellen Von Unwerth, Erwin Olaf, Sakae Takahashi. It probably contributed to my photography interest. I had a photographer friend in Paris, I would look at his pictures, watch him shoot. That surely contributed. Finally, when I got to Australia, I stayed with my sister and her boyfriend for a few months. I had acces to his DSLR and started to use ot often. After moving to Sydney, it didnt take me long to buy my own camera. Overall, it might just come from a sense of visual aesthetic, with no skills whatsoever in crafting or drawing to bavl it up. Photography was my savior: press the trigger, make a picture.
Did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become when you started here? 
 In my mind, I could see myself drawn to the art practice in photography, while being aware I did like the idea of playing with commercial aesthetic and tools. At the same time, I have been willing to try everything: in school I knew I’d have the luxury to explore photography and that I should cease this opportunity without being to rigid on my aspirations. I mean, I might end up falling in love with photo-journalism!

 

When you entered this competition what was going through your head. 
I felt like it was important to start applying to things out there. I want things to happen and not just wait to be graduated. I actually change last minute what I wanted to show because I wasn’t sure if they’d pick just one or the 3 images, and my other series had to be seen as a triptych.
Were you feeling confident?
 I guess I thought I was showing something good, so I wasnt surprise when I got in (I have no idea how many applicants there were), but I wouldnt have been surprised if I wasnt in either, and I wouldnt have been depressed about it. It felt like throwing a dice, and luckily it worked.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
 I’m pretty bad with rankings, I’ll make a list:
 -A specific environment can limit you to the self you were when you encountered it. Travelling to new places allow you to be the self you have become. Though, being aware of this is a big step to be able to stick yourself updated anywhere. In my case, it’s being loud.
-Don’t be afraid to ask for help or for an opportunity. I used to be too worried about the image it’d send of me. But people don’t mind, and they can’t help you if they don’t know what you’re thinking.
-School wise (thanks to my previous uni experience): get rid of the highschool mentality about assignments. Keep thinking until you find how to make them exciting for you, even if to do so you have to play with the lines. It’s just way less effective to create something just for the sake of the grading.
 -Have a goal or a direction: it makes you move forward, even if you end up changing it (which you should as many time as needed). Sitting around with no purpose for too long is just depressing.
 -Giving too many life advices make you sound like an old geezer. But I’ve accepted my fate.
 -There’s nothing wrong leaving the ‘highway of life’ : highschool, uni, job, promotion, house, dog, kids. If you don’t feel at ease in your life, I’d advise to shake things up. If it turns bad, please don’t sue me.

Jules Perrenot, 2017

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far? 
 The accumulation of all the assignements in a 2 weeks period can be tough. Especially since I end up being excited by my projects, it can easily become too time consuming to juggle it with the rest of my life.
 What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far? 
 During the first week, I bonded really quickly with a few people from my class, that was such an exciting feeling, I felt ” Your time at Psc is going to be great, you made the right choice”.
How has your style developed? What have you noticed is different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach? 
 Hmmm, Im still really unsure about all lf the above. I tend to go in lots of directions, and Im not sure it’ll change. It is fine at the moment as I am exploring possibilities in 1st year, but I can see it getting in the way in the future. Im just a bit over the idea we always have to brand ourselves, which often requires to specialize, keep it cohesive, to create an overall story-telling for the audience. I’d rather do anything and everything I feel like doing, without much marketing thinking.
So far, what body of work have you been most proud of? 
 I guess I really enjoyed my first assignement in Sarina’s class: in two weeks I managed to pull off something I really enjoy, that was fun. I’ve seen it too much though, I’m a bit over it at the moment.

Jules Perrenot, 2017

What are you working on at the moment? 
 I want to enter Bowness and a few prizes in June. We had a talk with Hoda and she talked me into creating a series out of a few images I already had. It’ll be a sort of sad gay sexy shrine to myself. Funtime.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
It’s mostly keeping my life social and keeping in touch with friends I now have less time to see. And then I Netflix and die in my bed: I can be quite the extraverted guy but I need my alone time with my computer. I guess it’s how milennials get introspective: getting lost on the internet.
Where do you find your motivation? 
 Keeping things interesting ? Immobilism alienates me, I like things to move and evolve.
What is your dream job/shoot? 
 Being exhibited and going full art-wank in fancy places, a glass of champaign at hand. Being French, Im already pretentious, I just need to be successful now.   Also, if I end up with a commercial practice, I want to be hired for my concepts, not to capture someone else’s ideas.
To keep up to date with Jules’ work, follow him on Instagram