Friday Feature: Jade Byrnes

No stranger to photo books, Jade Byrnes’ graduating folio ‘Kinglake’ found her as a finalist in the Australian Photo Book of The Year Awards; as well as being nominated for the MACK First Book Award. The documentary series looking at trauma within the landscape, was also exhibited at the Centre for Contemporary Photography where it received the award for Best Self-Published Photo Book.

 

Jade Byrnes, ‘Kinglake’, 2016

 

Jade finished her studies at PSC last year dedicating her year-long folio to Kinglake… 

“Like many other Australian towns, Kinglake; a town located in the shire of Murrindindi 65km north of Melbourne, has a long history of bushfires. It consists of farmland, forests, national parks and a small township. The most recent and severe bushfire that affected the area was the 2009 Black Saturday Bushfire, which took many lives, destroyed more than a hundred-thousand hectares of land and displaced hundreds of people.”

Jade Byrnes, ‘Kinglake’, 2016

“Studies have shown that due to climate change, fires in Victoria, Australia, are more likely to occur every two to three years, rather than every thirty years, as was the case 100 years ago. Kinglake is about the aftermath of fires in the landscape, it traces the trauma and effects on both the land and the people who inhabit it.”

 

Jade Byrnes, ‘Kinglake’, 2016

 

Jade’s work is currently on display at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre at 210 Lonsdale street, Melbourne Monday to Friday 8:30am to 6:30pm for the Month of March.

See more work by Jade

 

 

Thursday Feature: Agata Mayes

Now in the 3rd stage of the part-time Advanced Diploma course, Agata Mayes has been working on developing her personal style.
Her latest series “Inside The Mind” has been created to explore in-depth, the sensation of unexplained, severe fear.

 

“My recent body of work is not an analysis and does not answer the question “why” but focuses on how it feels  with a complete acceptance of this state. The aim of this work is to return to deeply repressed emotions and past experiences. This is an opportunity for the viewer to revisit “the inside”, reconnect with what is “real” and  abandon the idea of “wrong” which might lead into a personal interpretation.”

 

Agata Mayes, ‘Inside The Mind’, 2016

 

Born in Poland, and after living in Italy and England where she completed studies in informatics in 2003, Agata moved to Australia in 2011. Her passion for photography lead her to short courses and workshops before she finally decided to take up part-time study with PSC’s Advanced Diploma course. Before arriving at PSC to refine her technical skills and the conceptual understanding of photographic art, Agata won the “Kayell Best Commercial Work” at the Centre for Contemporary Photography salon in 2015, and was already actively involved in the photographic community 6 years earlier.

“I am an artist with an interest in psychology and my work reflects how I see the world. My aim is to study the human mind, explore the subject of ego and to understand what makes us who we are. My ultimate goal is to create something timeless which will remain as evidence of my life once I leave my body form.”

 

Agata Mayes, ‘Inside The Mind’, 2016

 

Agata Mayes’ series “Inside The Mind” is on display at the Queen Victoria Womens Centre for the month of March, open from 8:30am to 6:30pm Monday-Friday at 210 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne.

Follow Agata on Instagram

 

Wednesday Feature: Sonja Broersen

With graduation only two months away, Sonja Broersen is living and working in Melbourne after completing the Bachelor course last year, majoring in art.

Focussing on themes of self and using a minimalist language, Sonja’s current work “Soft Stone” consists largely of self portraiture, with the addition of still life and sculptural elements, using photography to reflect on her experience with feminine identity.
This series was exhibited at her graduate show Always Already, at Besser Space, Melbourne (2016). Previous work includes self-published photobook Distance (2015), exhibited as part of the group show Kapow! (2015) at Ruffian Gallery, Melbourne. Broersen has also recently exhibited works in exhibitions such as the IPF Photo Prize (2016) and the CCP Salon (2016).

Sonja Broersen, ‘Soft Stone’, 2016

 

Soft Stone is a body of work that is the result of continual reflection and a lingering confusion of what it means to photograph the self. It has evolved from a simple intrigue into an illusive and largely intuitive desire to gain a better understanding of my identity as a woman. The driving force of this work is a conflict I find within myself – a contradiction of actions and beliefs that stems from growing up with unattainable and damaging social expectations – the back and forth of embracing and rejecting femininity.

We are now living in a time where embracing femininity is just as empowering as rejecting it. This has prompted me to reflect on myself and reevaluate my identity as an adult woman. I am not looking to reach any sort of conclusion – I am merely attempting to gain a wider understanding of one part of my identity. My experiences are, and continue to be, unique; I am not attempting to reflect a universal experience of womanhood or femininity. This project is the result of my own reflection, investigation, and experience.

Sonja Broersen, ‘Soft Stone’, 2016

 

 

See more of Sonja’s work

 

Tuesday Feature: Emma Watson

Completing the Bachelor course last year, majoring in art; Emma Watson is set to graduate from PSC this May. Emma’s work will also be on display at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre for the month of March. Be sure to go see it along with other students‘ who are involved in the exhibition ‘Elements‘.

Emma Watson, ‘Folding’ 2016

 

Currently working as a freelance photographer, her monochromatic work is quietly spoken and very personal. It focuses on themes of memory, mental illness, family and identity. Drawing from past and present experiences she uses her camera to escape from her mind and to help make sense of her place in society.

Emma’s graduating folio ‘Folding’ revolves around her relationship with her family as she comes to deal with depression and a new family dynamic.

 

 

For my entire childhood I’ve grown up with the most loving, connected, family bond one can ever imagine; where everything has always felt so secure and safe, a sanctuary where all the corrupt things the world generates can’t touch you, or in other words, a safe embassy I’ve always seeked asylum in.

On the 17th of August 11:15 am I was diagnosed with clinical depression. My emotional reserves are completely empty. I find myself wanting to cry everyday and everything overwhelms me. The more depressed and lonely I get, the more I isolate myself from the outside world diminishing my motivation to reach out to people. Delivering this news to my family is still to this day, the coldest and cruelest moment I’ve ever shared with them.

I used to think life-changing news brought people closer together. Yet for some reason I found myself feeling more and more distant and isolated than ever before. It’s so difficult now to decode the reality. When my family surrounds me, I feel this overwhelming sense of distance and disregard on their behalf. I hear the sound of the cracks forming between us and growing bigger every day, but it’s so unclear to understand the cause of this breaking.

Is my family still there for me and I just can’t see it anymore. Or are they trying to reach out to me and I’m choosing to run away.

All of this coincided with my last year of photographic studies and I decided to use my camera to explore this very new to me family dynamic. So, I started interfering with my history; I cropped out family photos, covered aspects of my home and became the perpetrator of fading certain memories.
My camera brought me closer to my family roots. I scrambled through our lines to reconnect with the way things used to be. But I’m ultimately using this body of work as a way to communicate with my family.

 

 

See More of Emma’s work 

Emma Watson, ‘Folding’, 2016

Monday Feature: Rochelle Hansen

Completing the bachelor course last year, Rochelle Hansen is set to graduate this May from PSC.

Based in Melbourne as a documentary photographer, much of Rochelle’s work explores our relationship with nature as she pushes to blur the line between art and documentary photography. Through stillness and a kind of sedative process, Rochelle intends to capture the collision between humankind and the natural world. Using photographs as a token of absence and a way of reconnecting the lost and forgotten relationship once shared with Earth and it’s inhabitants.

 

By combining strength and movement, horses have the ability to effortlessly floor across the arena in a kind of poetic dance- that sees human and horse uniting on the stage, engaged in an intimate communication barely visible to an audience. 
‘Two’ Documents the relationship built between human and horse within the training process. I have worked with trainers who utilise positive training techniques and focus on creating partnerships built on trust and respect.

 

Rochelle’s work is a part of the ‘Elements’ exhibition at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre at 210 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne

 

 

 

 

Rochelle Hansen, ‘Two’

Part-time course anticipation

With part-time courses starting on Tuesday the 28th of February, we thought we would catch up with current part-time students about how they’re doing so far…

 

“It’s good, they’ve been really informative” – Aaron Walker

“I’ve been able to blend my job with my practice which has been really good”- David Owen

“This environment is just… it’s just such a good place to be”… “I don’t think I would be where I am if I didn’t have this sort of structured education” – Ian Crick

 

Sign up now here or feel free to contact us on (03) 9682 3191

 

 

 

Aaron Walker

Ian Crick

Welcome to one of our newest tutors; Kristian Haggblom

We’re incredibly happy to have Kristian Haggblom joining us at PSC as one of our fantastic tutors!
Kristian is an artist, curator and academic whose interests include expanded documentary and dialogues between photography and text.

In 2010 he was the inaugural artist-in-residence at the Australia Council for Arts in Finland Studio. Haggblom completed his PhD at Monash University in 2014 and he is the founder of Wallflower Photomedia Gallery.

Welcome to PSC Kristian, we’re all looking forward to getting some amazing advice and chatting about our work.
See more of Kristian’s work here

PSC pals – A new student mentor program for 2017 – Featuring Kaitlyn Church

Starting in 2017, we have a new student peer-to-peer mentoring program called PSC pals. The program gives current second and third year students the ability to mentor and support students who are new to PSC.

Throughout the year in 2017, we will be bringing you updates from the PSC pals program, but until then we will be featuring one of the PSC pals student mentors here on our blog and on our social media channels per week until the start of semester one.

For our final week, we’re glad to feature Kaitlyn Church (second year 2017).

by Kaitlyn Church

PSC students, graduates and staff amongst finalists for Australian Photobook of the Year Award

We’re thrilled to share the news of the following finalists for the Australian Photobook of the Year Award!

  • Hannah Nikkelson, Golden Triangle (Self Published) – final year bachelor degree student
  • Fuad Osmancevic, Elsewhere (Self Published) – final year bachelor degree student
  • Jade Byrnes, Kinglake (Self Published) – 2016 graduate of the bachelor degree
  • Clare Steele, J.W. (Self Published) – 2015 graduate of the bachelor degree
  • Katrin Koenning & Sarker Protick, Astres Noirs (Chose Commune) – Katrin Koenning teaches the Photojournalism major in our bachelor degree and Sarker Protick has taught a bunch of our bachelor degree students in workshops at the Obscura Festival of Photography workshops in Penang, Malaysa.

Congratulations everyone! The winners will be announced on Friday the 17th of February – we can’t wait to hear!

(L to R) Astres Noirs, Golden Triangle, J.W., Kinglake, Elsewhere.