Feature Friday: Noah Thompson

The July 21st Feature Friday is a quick insight of second year bachelor student Noah Thompson. Earlier this year Noah was a finalist in the National portrait prize, he was involved in an exhibition at the Melbourne Immigration Museum titled “They Cannot Take The Sky” which was made into a book. Noah was also successful in receiving the Maribyrnong City Council art grant that allowed him to have a solo exhibition at the Trocadero Art Space in Footscray and put his work”Footscray Hair” into a book.

 

We had a chat with the busy artist and learned about where he is now and where he wants to be as he prepares for his fourth semester at PSC.

 

Noah Thompson, 2017, ‘Footscray Hair’

 

Why did you choose photography?
I moved around quite a bit growing up, going from Tasmania to remote parts of the Northern Territory to living overseas for a couple of years, I think this gives anyone impressions of places and people that are hard to articulate with words. Which I think is what photography allows me to do, though I’ve only realised this recently. I also like people and am interested in their stories and how individual circumstance often relates to wider social, environmental, economic or political situation. I completed a BA in International Studies which involved studying sociology, international development, conflict studies, etc. It has always been my intention to combine these two interests.
Where do you want to go with photography?
I want to get involved with photojournalism and NGO work as well as work on longer-term documentary projects. At the moment I’m interested in exploring a wide variety of subjects relating to social justice, war, migration, economics, refugees and community. I think photography is an important tool in generating discussion around difficult, controversial or important issues and also invaluable in disseminating untold aspects of a given issue.
Who/what inspires you?
Kind people, my mum.
What do you enjoy about photography?
I like that it gets me out and about, talking to people, asking questions, out of my comfort zone.
Stay up to date on Noah’s work by following him on Instagram

Noah Thompson, 2017, ‘Footscray Hair’

Feature Friday; Natalie Renee Vicari

Today, July 14th, we are featuring second year bachelor student Natalie Renee Vicari.

Natalie Vicari

What got you started in photography?
I had always really liked photography over other artistic mediums, but I didn’t get started photographing until I was 18 and got given my cousin’s old camera for my 18th.
When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
I had a pretty broad idea of what kind of photography I wanted to do: mostly commercial-based stuff, like working for magazines. But after having many guest speakers in our first year, documentary photography, more specifically war journalism or political protests documentation has sparked an interest in me too.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
Honestly, learning how to actually use my camera properly. Since my third week back in first year at PSC, I’ve been using manual mode and have never touched the preset modes on my camera. The difference is astronomical. On a more serious note, I also learned that art is quite subjective and forgiving, as anything can be turned into an art project now if you can explain yourself eloquently and put in the effort.
What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Getting a grasp on the digital and editing aspect of photography and understanding what the different functions in Lightroom can do to an image, and pretty much everything I have learned in Photoshop.
What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
This year having the freedom to do a folio on any topic I choose, and having that creative freedom now, as opposed to last year, when I have a much better understanding of the medium and the ways in which I can manipulate it to speak my language.
How has your style developed? What have you noticed is different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach?
I now try to think of multiple ways to visually portray what I want to say, and attempt all of those ways instead of just picking the most obvious, or the easiest of the options. I also feel as though I am a lot more methodical in my shooting: I always have a brainstorm for each shoot I do, and a clear idea, and most of the time, the steps I need to take to get to the end product.
So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
I’m really proud of my first proper attempt at studio shots, particularly my studio portraits. Getting to work in the studio this year has really solidified my passion to pursue a photographic career in studio.

Natalie Vicari

What are you working on at the moment?
I am currently working on my folio, which is a series of 15 significant moments in my life, beginning at my parent’s separation, documenting my battle with depression and suicidal tendencies, to now being well into recovery and actually enjoying my life.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
Most of the time, I’m on YouTube watching a range of different videos: everything from gaming, to baking and cooking, to compilations of funny X Factor auditions. I think I would like to one day take a swing at making YouTube videos, but for now I’m sticking to photography.
Where do you find your motivation?
It’s probably not the best source, but more often than not my motivation comes from looming deadlines. Sometimes knowing that the due date is closer makes your brain actually kick into gear to think of ideas and to execute them.
Who/what inspires you?
YouTube, music, movies and television are probably the most broad source of inspiration for me, but also a lot of the new artists I get introduced to through my classes at PSC are also incredibly eye-opening.
What is your dream job/shoot?
I would like to one day do a shoot with Victoria’s Secret, either at one of their fashion shows, or for one of their campaigns, with the VS Angels. I would also like to be the photographer on tour with one of my favourite musicians at some point in my career. Fingers crossed at least one of those come true!

Natalie Vicari

Friday Feature; Shannon Ogrizek

Today we catch up with level 5 Advanced Diploma of Photography student Shannon Ogrizek

Shannon Ogrizek

 
What got you started in photography?
I love taking photos and wanted to learn how some of the famous photographers created their photos, but also I wanted to do it because there are endless possibilities and ideas on how to create images.

When you started at PSC, did you have an idea of the kind of photographer you want to become?
I had no idea what kind of photographer I wanted to become, I just really wanted to create my images, express my emotions and feelings through my images, as well as create images that I would love. I also really enjoy making images for clients; I like going through the process with clients seeing what they want, progression through that and then the final result. I’m a photographer of everything, I never turn down a job or an idea I’ll always give it a go, it doesn’t matter if it’s completely different to what I have done previously.

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
Most beneficial would have been to just create images that you want to create, create images that you will be proud of and happy with at the end of the day.

 

Shannon Ogrizek

 

What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
Finding ideas for folio work and pushing those each and every shoot to get a magnificent photo and have it be something that I’m proud of, knowing I worked hard for.

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC so far?
Most rewarding moment at PSC is always end of year finals, seeing my hard work and effort go into my folios every trimester and being able to see the final result at the end of it is just a really rewarding experience for me.

So far, what body of work have you been most proud of?
My most proud body of work I have made was my movement images and my domestic violence posters that went up around Melbourne.

 

Shannon Ogrizek

 

What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I’m working on a body of images that is of the natural world, but incorporating slow shutter speeds with that. However I’m just constantly shooting with models and products, being active with my photography.

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
If I’m not taking photos I’m usually on Instagram getting inspiration for a shoot I’d like to do in the near future.

Where do you find your motivation?
I find my motivation from other photographers work, being given encouragement and feedback.

Who/what inspires you?
There’s so many photographers that I’d like to talk about for this particular question but I really love Lindsay Adler and her work. A few Melbourne photographers, in particular a friend of mine Andy Swann, as well as scrolling through Instagram.

What is your dream job/shoot?

I really do love taking portraits/football photos/weddings and debutantes as well as landscapes/light trails, really anything that’s fashion or has animals.

 

To see more of Shannon’s work, like her Facebook page.

Shannon Ogrizek

 

Feature Friday; Anthony Mayze

The Australian Professional Photography Awards are coming up, which means our students are now preparing their state award-winning images for the national competition.

One such student is Anthony Mayze who studies the Advanced Diploma of Photography. Now with an incredible achievement of three silver awards, Anthony sat down to have a quick chat about his journey so far at PSC.

 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

 

Where did your interest in photography start? 
I joined studio arts in high-school which led me to focus on seascape photography as well as some astrophotography and I grew my love from there.
Back when you started at PSC, did you have an idea of what sort of photographer you wanted to become?
I had no idea where I wanted my photography to lead me, but always thought that I would alway choose a commercial path.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
The most beneficial lesson in life is; what ever you put in, you get out, so always try your hardest. Photographic-wise would have to be learning to project emotions and personality into my work.
What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
 My most challenging moment at PSC would have to be the folios; having a short time to execute everything and then to present it was rather difficult but I have always managed to prevail!
What about your most rewarding moment so far? 
My most rewarding moment would have to be when I won a silver award in the VIPPY awards.
How has your style changed? Have you noticed anything different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach?
I have noticed that I am putting more consciousness behind my images in terms of looking out for distractions, as well as looking at ways to put my own twist on images. I have also realised that I love simplicity in my work.
So far, what body of work are you most proud of?
My trimester 4 folio on personal experiences with stress, frustration and sadness.

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

What are you working on now?
 I’m about to start working on building from my ‘Stress, Frustration and Sadness’ concept with editorial fashion techniques.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photos I’m either working, spending too much money with friends or watching Netflix.
Where do you find your motivation?
 I find my motivation everywhere, whether it be a film or in life I can always find ways that sparks my imagination.
What or who inspires you?
Two major inspirations in the photographic world are Annie Leibovitz and Gregory Crewdson, their work is amazing. Another huge inspiration is my Nan who always wished for me to hold on to my dreams until I have achieved them
What is your dream job?
Ever since starting my journey in photography, my dream shoot has always been to recreate scenes from Beauty and the Beast with a Gregory Crewdson style.
 To stay up-to-date with Anthonys work, follow him on Instagram! 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

Friday Feature; Emily Skelton

Currently in her second-last semester at PSC, Advanced Diploma of Photography student Emily Skelton is already setting up her career; working with her local football club, as well as becoming a well-known figure around her hometown of Bacchus Marsh.

We caught up with Emily to learn more about her journey so far.

 

 

Emily Skelton

 

 

 

When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 

At the end of year 12 and the start of PSC I had this idea of being a famous fashion photographer, the one who takes incredible Vogue cover shots. I wanted to control the day, the shoot and get all creative, but as I started to learn at PSC it was becoming harder for me to see that for myself. My ideas started to change, I still wanted to do really creative things, but I wanted to be able to capture moments people would have for a lifetime.

 

What got you started in photography?

My mum and dad handing me a 35mm camera at the age of 2. That’s how it started, taking photos for mum and dad when they wanted to be in the picture. Mum has a particular photo in an album at home of herself and my sister, under the photo the caption says “photo by Emily”; I was 2.
I was never was really good at English and Math at school, so art was always my favourite subject. I was a very good painter, but I realise now that whenever we went out I would end up with the camera in my hands and I would be taking photos of everything from the ground, to the plants, to my family. Then as I got older I wanted to do more, so I would plan out photoshoots and get my friends to model for me. I still remember the first photoshoot I did; I borrowed a Canon camera off a friend, I pinned a white sheet up in my grandmothers granny flat with my friends in front of it wearing white t-shirts. We had bright-coloured paint and used it to paint my friends hands, then print it onto their face. I loved it and that for me was the beginning of everything, but I wanted more.

 

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC?

Not that I’m big on grades and all, but receiving a mark which I didn’t think I would get really showed me that if I push myself more I can truly achieve what I want. Being a part of open days and career expos has also been really rewarding too, as I can tell people my story and my experience here, as well as being able to meet potential students and make new friends.

 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned? 

Before I came to PSC I was self-taught; I shot jpegs in my backyard on a little Sony camera. I have benefited  from everything; starting with the basic stuff in first-year, to all the studio set-up now. I have learned how to capture an image with the correct light and what angles to shoot from, I have learned how to use my camera and control it so I can get the very best out of images. If you had told my high-school self this, I would not have believed you at all. This course and school has changed me for the better, I have grown so much in my work and myself and I have truly found something I love.

 

 

Emily Skelton

 

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?

Everything has been challenging in its own way and of course some things will be harder than others, some things take more time to learn, or sometimes you don’t have an idea and you have to work with what you’ve got and go for it.

 

What are you working on at the moment? 

At the moment I’m working on lots! I’m shooting every Saturday for the Bacchus Marsh Cobras (local footy club) which is a thing I keep growing and manage to get a new angle every week. I’m also working on building up my clients by shooting a few weddings. I have done a few jobs that have been printed onto glass and have now been installed into peoples new kitchens. I am always working on the next creative shoot I could be doing. It’s a good thing I have two sisters; one that wants to be a special effects makeup-artist, and the other who wants to be model. We are always coming up with new ideas and things we can work on together.

 

Where do you find your motivation?

Myself, and my life which includes my family and friends, as well as any events that happen.

 

Emily Skelton

 

Where do you want to take your photography?

Everywhere! I want to take it from within my hometown to overseas. I want to create or capture moments. As long as I’m creating and exploring the world with my camera; I’ll be happy. I want my photos to help people remember their moments in life because if you have an image, you know you’re not going to forget it.

 

Who/what inspires you?

Everything inspires me; I draw elements of life events into my work, from random creative ideas that happen to personal things that have happened. Watching movies also give me ideas as does the music I listen to.

 

How has your style developed?

Well my style has developed from shooting with natural light, with a white sheet in my backyard (which I still do) to setting up studio lights and controlling everything. My style has grown with me and we both have changed over the years as I try to find myself and where I belong in the photography world.

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?

I’m either at my local cafe with friends drinking coffee, or I’m at home sleeping, but sometimes I work with my dad.

 

What advice would you give to current students?

You can make it! Keep pushing and build up your foilo, believe in yourself and just keep working hard because hard work can get you anywhere.

 

 

 

To keep up to date with Emily, follow her on Instagram 

 

Emily Skelton

2017 Graduate Feature; Jarred Mullenger

Today we are featuring graduating art photographer Jarred Mullenger, Jarred is our second 2017 graduate to be featured in Son Of A Gun Magazine. We caught up with Jarred to find out more about his connection to photography and his graduating folio “It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown”.

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

What attracted you to photography?
Well I was always a creative person growing up. Anything creative that used imagination and was out of the ordinary I was drawn to. I started off sketching. While everyone else was outside playing at lunchtime, I was in the art room having drawing lessons. It was my time to escape the routines of school and let my imagination run free. Moving forward a handful of years, I discovered the film camera and the darkroom; then my lunchtimes continued to be spent inside developing film and experimenting in the darkroom, so that’s where the interest in photography started.

 

Did you have an idea when you first started at PSC of the kind of photographer  you wanted to become?
I envisioned becoming the complete opposite to what I am today. I always imagined being a fashion photographer for magazines and runway and then slowly moving into being a designer.

 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
Accepting uniqueness and allowing time to grow.

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

 

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
Overcoming self doubt, growing a voice and being confident in my own unique practice.

 

What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Making a strong group of friends that all share the same interest, teachers included! My confidence in my practice and also myself has grown a lot, as well as having a strong final series that I’m proud of.

 

 

How has your style developed?
My style has developed immensely and will always continue to do so. Through years of experimenting and questioning everything you’re doing and through trial and error your style will change naturally.

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

 

 

What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
The work I presented for the final folio focussed on the family dynamics in my house and interprets my view on the family aura in my household, looking at the changes that have occurred over time. I focussed on the strong female presence in the house following the separation of my parents and the repercussions it’s had on myself. Through this project I have begun to accept the disconnect that has established over time and now looking into the future for what lies ahead outside of the four walls I call home.

Unconsciously all my previous work had been very personal or a reflection of myself without me intentionally doing so, so I wanted to flip that around and see what would happen if I made work that is a self reflection of myself and go from there.

 

 

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m continuing with my final folio work which has the potential for me to work on for am lifetime, so who knows.

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

 

What advice would you give to current students?
You only get out as much as you put in!

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When my mind is not on photography, it’s either on fashion, family and friends, or being with nature.

 

Where do you find your motivation?
Motivation comes from a lot of things; everyday mundane activities can cause me to get a possible image in my end which I create into a digital image over time. Seeing other people succeed helps me stay motivated to achieve at the same level.

 

Who/what inspires you?
Friends and the family, the changes in our environment and other more established photographers.

 

What is your dream job/shoot?
Being a renowned artist exhibiting unique and personal work at a high standard in galleries locally and also internationally.

 

 

Follow Jarred and his ongoing work on his Instagram

 

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Shannon MacKenzie

Feature Friday!! Today we are catching up with Shannon MacKenzie who studied commercial photography at PSC.

 

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

 

What got you started in photography?
I started in photography because I needed to get out of my career as a criminologist and felt my art was confining me indoors. I wanted to get out into the world and see beauty.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 
When I first started at PSC I imagined I would become a wedding photographer. A new career with beauty and happiness.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
The main thing I learnt was photography can be fine art, I was inspired by readings and constructive advise from one teacher, even if it was negative.
What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The most challenging time I had at PSC was staying true to me, it’s easy to get lost or intimidated by others work.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
The most rewarding moment at PSC was gaining my idol as my mentor.
I have moved so far away from an aspiring wedding photographer it’s unbelievable what I can achieve through a camera lens instead of on canvas.

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was about social demographics and how we portray ourselves in public where we receive such criticism but behind closed doors we all live the same, we are one society. I came to this idea after looking into what the census was about.
What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I am back in criminology work and working on forensic photography. I am also laying down the initial sketches for a mixed media art/photography exhibition by spring.
What advice would you give to current students?
Experiment with all avenues of photography and pick the one that feels right and gets your creative side pushing you to do more. Stay true to that and aim for your work to shine.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photo’s I study for my master’s and work. But I’m always planning.

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

Where do you find your motivation?
My motivation is everywhere. It can be a moment that makes you take note or turn back to get this image on your phone while taking down a note of time and place. I have gone from wedding to surrealism but still have that element of beauty.
Who/what inspires you?
I’m inspired by my mentor Brooke Shaden, she understands the way I see things and I understand her direction.
What is your dream job?
My dream job would be to create a large piece of work for a corporate/commercial/cultural buildings foyer.
To follow Shannon’s work on Instagram click here

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Morgan Hancock

Today’s graduate feature is photojournalist Morgan Hancock who has taken up a position at The Standard; a fairfax newspaper delivering the latest news and events in Warrnambool and south-west Victoria. We asked him a few questions about his time at PSC and now working in the industry straight out of study.

Morgan Hancock, 2016

What got you started in photography?
I got started in photography during high school, I took it as an elective as I had always enjoyed taking photos, during the school year I quickly realised how much I loved photography, and the creative scope that it allowed for.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
When I first started at PSC, I imagined that I would become an all round better photographer. I had always enjoyed photographing sport so I wanted to see myself as a sport photographer, having completed my degree it made me a better photographer in every aspect.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
PSC taught me a lot of time management skills, as well as thinking outside of the box which is ultra important in the photography industry.

Morgan Hancock

 What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The most challenging moment at PSC would be the very beginning; I found it quite hard to get my head around all of the new aspects, including thinking of a folio, getting used to how PSC works and getting to know all of the new faces.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
The most rewarding part was right at the end, when it was possible to have a look at the folio that I had created in the final year, which was a culmination of hard work over the prior years.
How has your style developed?
My photographic style has developed into a lot more of a documentary style. When I first began, I had attempted to create documentary works, however at the end of the three years my style was certainly a lot clearer.
 What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was based around spending a year inside a football club; this came about from my huge passion for football, and the simple fact that it quite often isn’t documented in such a way.
What are you working on at the moment?
I am currently working at the Warrnambool Standard as a photographer, I am also working on some personal projects on the side; ranging from more sport photography work, to photographing abandoned sites.

Morgan Hancock

What advice would you give to current students?
I would tell them to enjoy the challenge, and make the most of being able to choose their own folio ideas.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photo’s there is a high chance that I will be off watching sport, or exploring a new place.
Where do you find your motivation?
I find motivation from constantly looking at other photographers work; I love spending time looking through world class photographers’ photos. Nothing motivates me more than flicking through a magazine or Instagram, and seeing images that I can have the opportunity to create.
Who/what inspires you?
I am mainly inspired by the dream that I can one day spend my time traveling and photographing sport, whilst creating jaw dropping images.
What is your dream job/shoot?
My long term goal has always been to work at a newspaper and/or an agency like Getty Images. My dream shoot would be the opportunity to cover the Olympic Games.
See more of Morgan’s work here on his website 

Morgan Hancock

2017 Graduate Feature; Bella Johnson

This week we are featuring photojournalist student Bella Johnson in the lead up to graduation on May 19th; only two weeks away-Yikes!

Bella Johnson, ‘Curious Eyes’, 2016

What got you started in photography?
In year 11 I stepped into a darkroom, got taught the process and handed a Pentax k1000, I couldn’t believe (and still don’t) how Magic the process is.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
I imagined I’d become a travel photographer.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
To trust your gut. It’s said a lot, but so true, especially to documentary photography.
What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The moments you question yourself and your practice.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Picking up my final project from the printers.
How has your style developed?
I still shoot 35mm colour film, I wont ever stop. But I’ve recently built a darkroom and am getting back into black and white photography. I shoot impulsively, it’s a feeling, not a thought, my style revolves around intimacy with moments.

What was your graduating folio about?
It was about youth. Capturing candid moments of intimacy. It was a diaristic approach to the world around me.
How did you arrive at this idea?
I found it really difficult choosing a folio theme, but trusted my gut, and shot what I was attracted to and what I was already shooting, my friends.
What are you working on at the moment?
Still the same body of work about youth, I don’t think it’ll end.

Bella Johnson, ‘Curious Eyes’, 2016

What advice would you give to current students?
Trust your gut.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I make art, I write lots, watch documentaries, listen to vinyl and drink gin.

Bella Johnson, ‘Curious Eyes’, 2016

Where do you find your motivation?
Art, the street, people, conversations, music, film, travel, just about everything.
Who/what inspires you?
People, the world.
What is your dream job/shoot?
Travel photography, to travel the world, meet people and capture intimate moments to show the rest of the world.
See Bella’s website for more of her work on ‘Curious Eyes’ 

2017 Graduate Feature; Zac Dorio

Our graduate being featured today is photojournalist and surfer Zac Dorio.

Zac Dorio, 2016

 

What got you started in photography?
I got started in photography when I first realised that I could capture a moment and keep it forever as an image, being able to capture that slice of time really got me thinking.

 

When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
When I first started at PSC I had NO idea what kind of photography genre I liked, what style or where I would see myself! I was just happy and open to try new things and experiment.

 

Zac Dorio, 2016 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
Through studying at PSC throughout the years I learned to be versatile in my work, be willing to try new things and step outside my comfort zone.

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
My most challenging moment at PSC was probably when I had to shoot fashion / editorial type of images, I had no experience in that field. It was tough but I came out with some really strong images.

 

What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
My most rewarding PSC moment was seeing my work printed at our end of year exhibition ‘Always Already’. To know where I had come from and how hard I had worked for that, seeing my work on the wall just made me realise how far I had come and how worth it it all was.

 

What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was about the ocean, the connection and interaction I have with the ocean via a passion of surfing and photography. I always enjoyed shooting surf and surf lifestyle, so I was automatically drawn to the sea. I wanted to document it in a way that was personal to me and also told a story and showed that connection.

 

Zac Dorio, 2016

 

What advice would you give to current students?
I would just say be passionate about what you do; always give 110% so that you know you gave it your very best. Push your boundaries and step outside your comfort zone

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I work in a busy little cafe making coffees, I surf and like to explore Victoria as much as possible .

 

What is your dream job/shoot?
My dream job is to work for a magazine / company following surfers around the world chasing adventures, good waves and good vibes.

 

To stay in the loop of what Zac is working on, follow him on Instagram.

 

Zac Dorio, 2016