PSC’s Pippa Milne and Katrin Koenning at CCP Declares: On The Social Contract

Pippa Milne, PSC teacher and curator for the Centre for Contemporary Photography, has curated the upcoming exhibition, CCP Declares exhibition: On The Social Contract, which will be opening at 6pm on Thursday 26th of May. 

Image by Mohini Chandra Untitled from Kikau Street 2015-16, from CCP's website

Image by Mohini Chandra Untitled from Kikau Street 2015-16, from CCP’s website

The exhibition will feature important work by award winning photographers such as Katrin Koenning (PSC teacher), Miriam Charlie, Pilar Mata Dupont, Elvis Richardson, Mohini Chandra, Tom Nicholson and Cherine Fahd. Pippa was inspired by these artists, who create work that looks at how society works and portray their understandings of the various rules of engagement between citizens, the state and the environment. The subject matter is particularly relevant to contemporary society as we feel the contracts and agreements between us stretch and (sometimes) break.

Image by Katrin Koenning from her series, 'The Crossing'

Image by Katrin Koenning from her series, ‘The Crossing’

Katrin’s series ‘The Crossing’ delves into the ‘fractured relationship’ between man and environment. Printed by ThePrintShop @ PSC, Katrin will reveal, for the first time in Melbourne, a first instalment of the larger, long-form work. Following on from her recent exhibition of the work at the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney as part of ‘Transfer‘, which also saw her steer a series of educational engagements in collaboration with ACP. Her exhibition here in Melbourne is a much anticipated event.

Images by Katrin Koenning from her series, 'Indefinitely'.

Images by Katrin Koenning from her series, ‘Indefinitely’.

Katrin ‘s work ‘Indefinitely’ is currently featuring in a solo show at The Lost Ones Gallery in Ballarat (re-opening on June 1 – June 19). Her ‘Dear Chris’ series will be on show at Verge Gallery in Sydney soon (June 3 – 25),  and ‘The Crossing’ is also currently featuring as part of Noorderlicht Festival ‘Arena’, Netherlands. In addition to this, her first book ‘Astres Noirs’ (in collaboration with Sarker Protick) is due to be published this June by French publisher Chose Commune, and will be launched at Le Bal (Paris) and Les Rencontres D’Arles Festival in July. Pre-orders can be made at www.chosecommune.com

We’re proud of Pippa’s achievement with the curation of ‘CCP Declares: On The Social Contract’, and excited about Katrin’s work continuing to be in the spotlight of our industry. The PSC community is delighted to work with such exceptional staff who continue to guide and inspire our students everyday.

For more information about learning with us, visit our website

Carmen Reflects upon Her 10 Years of being at PSC

Carmen Edwards

Carmen Edwards

Carmen is PSC’s wonderful communications and students coordinator. She started working at PSC ten years ago this week and has a sea of experiences and memories to reflect on. Carmen is a major pillar of support for students in their academic and life matters, and is also a patron of the work produced at PSC having taken the opportunity to purchase many pieces of work created by students at our exhibitions. Here are some words about her past ten years at the college:

“One of the highlights of working at PSC is the joy of students discovering their passion for photography and excelling in it. To see a student start the course with relatively no photography skills, to push through and gain confidence, to persevere and succeed – it’s such a privilege to share that journey with them. I’ve learnt that it’s never too late to pursue your dreams, thanks to working with our part time students. When I see them reaping the rewards of their hard work, it reinforces how important it is to follow your passion and do what you love.

I started at PSC as a temp filling in at reception, within the fortnight I was a full time employee and soon after moved into the front of house supervisor and director’s p.a role. After a vacancy came up with a staff member going on maternity leave, I moved departments into the role of student relations officer. After about 2 years in this position, I was appointed into my current role of communications and students coordinator.

When I started at PSC we were still using analogue processes and darkrooms. I’ve been here during the transition from analogue to digital photography and witnessed the constant evolution at PSC as technology continues to develop. I’ve enjoyed seeing all the successes that the students and college has had, especially in the recent years with the consecutive industry accolades. There has been a growing number of award winning students as we’ve become a nationally recognised success story. My prediction is to watch this space as PSC and our students become an international success story! I’ve met many inspiring people, artists and photographers through PSC and made such wonderful friendships that I now treasure.

I’ve learnt so much from my mentors here, especially my director, and I’ve been able to collect a plethora of fond memories and experiences through all the fun times we’ve had amongst the students and staff. My final comment would be to quote Earl Nightingale – “Never give up on a dream just because of the time it will take to accomplish it. The time will pass anyway.” That’s so true!”

Feel free to have a chat with Carmen whenever you’re around our campus. Learn more about part time studies here.

Creating Conversations with Ying Ang : Sneak Preview of Obscura ’16

Ying Ang, teacher at PSC and the International Center of Photography (New York), has traveled extensively throughout her life. Moving between Singapore and various cities in Australia from the age of 10, the idea of packing her bags, immersing herself cultures so unfamiliar to her and having to learn new languages, doesn’t daunt her. In fact it has influenced her greatly in terms of who she is as a photographer.

Ying Ang

Most recently, she visited the charming city of Wellington to showcase her award winning photobook, ‘Gold Coast’ at Photobook New Zealand 2016. She was also invited to this festival as a keynote speaker where she talked about her photobooks and working with others to further promote the publication of this exciting movement in photography. 

“I was interested to see the diversity in story telling via the photo book medium at Photobook NZ. The new narratives that are emerging in the photo book are sophisticated and embracing of greater visual literacy that stems from the dissemination of photo imagery via the internet.”

 

Ying Ang presenting her talk at Photobook NZ 2016

Ying Ang presenting her talk at Photobook NZ 2016

Gold Coast Photobook by Ying Ang

Gold Coast Photobook by Ying Ang

Ying Ang has exhibited her work in practically every corner of the world since 2005 and is a member of the MJR creative (a dynamic photography collective comprising of international creatives). With her next big assignment as lead curator of the print exhibition at the Obscura Festival of Photography (Penang, August 2016) – the most influential photography festival in Asia Pacific – she aims to create a conversation that is relatable and socially relevant. 

“The majority of photographers at Obscura are based in Asia Pacific – a region which doesn’t see a lot of physical works of people from America and Europe. There’s an opportunity to introduce a conversation to people who are largely involved with telling stories based on what they think are socially relevant issues. After setting up an initial framework of concepts, we settled on ‘Pangea’ as the theme for the print exhibition.”

With her background in documentary photography, Ying is interested in subject matter or conversations about post-colonial issues, rifts between populations of the world as a result of the ‘drawing of borders’ in history, the uneven nature of globalisation and how the separation of ideologies has impacted the world’s biggest refugee crisis since WWII. 

Image by Ying Ang from her series 'Abandon Hope'

Image by Ying Ang from her series ‘Abandon Hope’

Pangea will be an exhibition that highlights stories voiced by photographers who have focused their work on related themes. To Ying, the most important aspect of curating Pangea was to make sure that selected photographers were fluent in their particular language of photography. They had to be experts on the subject or theme they were photographing. 

PSC students, staff and guest speakers at Obscura 2015

PSC students, staff and guest speakers at Obscura 2015

PSC is largely involved in the Obscura festival, with our 2nd year students having the wonderful opportunity to participate in the event every year. Ying has noticed that students who travel to Penang immerse themselves in a variety of discussions and cultures, often bringing those elements back to their classrooms when they return to Melbourne. 

“Students have a huge experience at the Obscura festival, marking a big change in their personal creative spheres of what they understand about their practice in a larger photography world.”

 

Image by Myra Davidson from Penang 2015

Image by Myra Davidson from Penang 2015

Image by Sebastian Corvi from Penang 2015

Image by Sebastian Corvi from Penang 2015

Upon being asked about her life as a photographer and curator, Ying feels that as a photographer one becomes an expert of a very specific part of the world – it’s like writing a thesis on a particular subject. On the other hand, she likens the experience of being a curator to dipping into a well of knowledge and putting a larger idea together. 

Image by Ying Ang (Instagram) of her time at a photobook masterclass

Image by Ying Ang (Instagram) of her time at a photobook masterclass

Ying is looking forward to another year of attending the Obscura Festival. She feels that the festival does a great job of creating an environment of education with a focus on panel discussions and workshops. She is excited about creating a larger dialogue for issues of importance, with photography. We wish her the best of luck with curating Pangea and will post updates about PSC’s journey at the Obscura Festival. 

Conceptualising a Women’s Day Exhibition with Julie Wajs

Teacher and head curator at PSC, Julie Wajs takes a fresh approach to curating an exhibition for one of the most important days of the year. For our ‘Women in Photography’ focus this month, she gives us an insight into the care taken to organise ‘Our Stories… Our Vision…’ . This is a celebration of International Women’s Day with works selected by PSC’s talented pool of female photographers. These are currently being exhibited at the Queen Victoria Women’s centre.

Here are Julie’s thoughts about the event and her approach to curating the exhibition:

For International Women’s Day our exhibition at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre had to be a selection of work by our female students across different majors of the college. It’s always good to have a bit of a mix in the scheme of things stylistically, especially in such a public space that has a historical aspect to it. We were very conscious of the fact that the centre supports women in all areas of life; both politically and emotionally, and the work chosen for this had to be reflective of that. There’s always a sense of responsibility when putting any exhibition together – you definitely have to be sensitive to the space you’re in.

By Elena D San Roman

By Elena D San Roman

Selecting some of the bigger pieces of work by students and graduates, the subject matter in each series deals with personal, political and fashion-related issues in some way, mirroring the perspective of women.

Margaret Lim

By Margaret Lim

What makes this exhibition interesting is the fact that it ranges across students who study full time and part time at PSC, which means that we are looking at work produced by a cross section of different generations. It’s a great way to see how a wide age group approaches certain topics differently, or sometimes in very similar ways.

By Emma McEvoy

By Emma McEvoy

I hope those who come to the exhibition are provoked into engaging with the work and having an opinion about them. It’s important for us to get people to think about some of the aspects that these photographs are touching upon.

To be a part of the exhibition, visit the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre on 210 Lonsdale Street, on 9th March at 6pm.  You can hear more about Julie’s process of curating here

Introducing Ilana Rose and Her Exhibition at Magnet Galleries on March 3

Ilana Rose Feature Post

Ilana Rose, professional photographer and photojournalist, is starting a new chapter at PSC as a lecturer. She has worked as a foreign correspondent for The Sunday Herald in the UK, and had recently worked with World Vision as a photographer and field resource advisor. She has spent the last 4 years meeting people in war zones and extreme drought conditions, capturing ‘the unseen’  – a subject that she has revolved her life’s work around. Ilana has always felt passionate about giving people a voice through her photography, further developing her style and niche of focusing on subcultures when she worked for newspapers earlier on in her career.

Image by Ilana Rose

Image by Ilana Rose

Getting into photography in her teens, Ilana was intrigued by the idea of capturing a moment in time and holding it forever. She went on to study graphic design at university, as her parents weren’t too keen on her treading the path of photography (since they were professionals). However, after a year she knew that she had to return to her love of taking photographs. She began her studies in photography and was soon hired by a local suburban newspaper to cover a wide range of stories.

“Everyday was completely different when I started my first job as a photographer. Suburbans are a great training ground for photographers because you have to do absolutely everything.”

Ilana’s career grew, allowing her to branch out to daily national newspapers and starting a studio of her own. She worked on photographs for The Age, working on series that looked at youth culture – subject matter that major publications hardly covered. With her studio photography, she developed an arts based practice, working for art and theatre companies. Ilana has an eclectic portfolio over the years; she has learnt so many things from her various experiences and now looks forward to sharing them with her students at PSC.

Image by Ilana Rose

Image by Ilana Rose

“The idea of nurturing and encouraging emerging photographers at PSC is so exciting. I see my time here as a collaboration, where I’ll be imparting my knowledge to students and learning from them as well.”

Ilana Rose will be showcasing her work with other photographers at the Magnet Galleries with the ‘No Lilies – Women and Work’ exhibition on Thursday, March 3 (6:30pm). The exhibition will be on till April 2nd.

Featuring Part Time Student Amanda Shackleton

Amanda Shackleton recently completed her Advanced Diploma in 2015. Being a part time student at PSC, Amanda was steadfast in securing a variety of assignments for herself within and outside PSC. Last July, she was selected for The Northsider internship, an opportunity organised by PSC teacher Bill Bachman for students every year.  After submitting a folio of work comprised of images she created at PSC and for external clients, Amanda had the chance to meet the photo-editor of The Northsider who then offered her the internship.

Image by Amanda Shackleton

Image by Amanda Shackleton

The Northsider is a local – community paper that features the culture and life of Melbourne’s northern suburbs. During her internship so far, Amanda has had the chance to cover portraits of different people and various local businesses (such as cafes and restaurants). She was also fortunate to shoot photographs for a feature on cerebral palsy, with the Cerebral Support Network in Preston. On top of this, the paper published her article about ‘The Humble Dumpling’. This was an assignment she had prepared for PSC, which then was chosen by The Northsider.

Image by Amanda Shackleton

Image by Amanda Shackleton

According to Amanda, the internship exposed her to different types of briefs and meeting press deadlines. She feels that her experience at PSC has provided the skills needed to meet the briefs at The Northsider.

Image by Amanda Shackleton. Click image to read her article.

Image by Amanda Shackleton. Click image to read her article.

‘We did a lighting on location class with Bill Bachman and Scott McNaughton last year, which was fantastic. I took the skills that I picked up in that class, into my shoots with The Northsider. The class taught me to think on my feet with the equipment I had, and look at ways of using natural light.”

Image by Amanda Shackleton.

Images by Amanda Shackleton.

Amanda also just had her final folio series at PSC, ‘Beer’s Run’ published by Trail Run magazine (January Edition). This is a remarkable photo-essay that Amanda created, after her experience of following runner Aiden Beer’s  100km marathon along The Great Ocean Road trail. Amanda also made a short documentary on this.

We wish Amanda all the best and look forward to seeing further developments in her work.

If you would like to learn more about the opportunities at PSC with our part time course options, feel free to contact us. 

Bill Bachman Gets Published in Australian Geographic’s 130th Edition

Bill Bachman, co-ordinator of the Photojournalism Major at PSC, recently had his work featured in the 130th edition of Australian Geographic magazine. From its founding in 1986 by Dick Smith, the journal quickly became Australia’s foremost geographical magazine. Known for it high quality writing, photography, illustration and cartography, the publication’s brief has always been to celebrate Australia’s best in the areas of landscape, natural history, science, industry and people. It has also faithfully maintained a strong focus on adventure and exploration.

Bill contributed a photograph to the very first issue more than 30 years ago and went on to become a favorite among the magazine’s regular contributors, shooting more than 25 features over as many years.

Bill Bachman is Featured in the Australian Geographic. Click the image to see more.

Bill Bachman is Featured in the Australian Geographic. Click the image to see more.

(Reproduced courtesy of Australian Geographic, © Bauer Media Group 2015)

He has long been a keen explorer of the Australian way of life in his own right, having written and photographed articles for a number of other magazines both here and overseas. He has also produced books such as Off The Road Again, a photographic diary of his outback travels, Special Delivery, a light-hearted look at Australia’s roadside art, The Murray River and the international best-seller Local Colour: Travels in the Other Australia, a thematic look at life beyond the urban fringe.

By Australian Geographic editor-in-chief Chrissie Goldrick

By Australian Geographic editor-in-chief Chrissie Goldrick

For the most recent edition of Australian Geographic he travelled to King Island to revisit a feature he shot in 2009. The accompanying excerpt from “Every Picture Tells a Story: 30 Years of AG Photography” by editor-in-chief Chrissie Goldrick makes note of Bill’s special relationship with the magazine. We’re delighted to have Bill as a key member of the PSC teaching team!

PSC Photojournalism Student Peter Williams Accompanies Michael Coyne to Vietnam

On the Road with Peter Williams

On the Road with Peter Williams

In the month of November (2015) PSC Senior Fellow Michael Coyne was set to go on a trip to Vietnam for his project on Villagers. As part of the photojournalism class that Michael mentors, he offered students a chance to accompany him to see what it’s like to be on location as a photojournalist, for one week.

While this was brewing, Fujifilm was in the process of selecting 100 photographers around the world to test their latest X – Series camera, known as the ‘X-Pro2‘ which was just launched on the 15th of January 2016. Michael was chosen as one of the 100 photographers, who would then have his work exhibited around the world as part of Fujifilm’s campaign.

By Michael Coyne

By Michael Coyne

Peter Williams, a photojournalism student in the Advanced Diploma course, was the first to contact Michael about the trip to Vietnam and was consequently selected. He readied himself for an experience of a lifetime, shortly after travelling to Bali where he documented people in the non-profit organisation, ‘Solemen‘.

By Peter Williams

By Peter Williams

Accompanying Michael Coyne was a remarkable experience for Peter, who received one-on-one mentoring  throughout the week. He felt that the trip went by quickly, as he was always on the go, heading to the north-western mountain ranges of Sapa, from the bustling city of Hanoi. During his trip, Peter sought the opportunity of capturing his experience by creating his own photography series, as well as a documentary about Michael Coyne’s journey in Sapa.

Here’s a teaser of the video which will be released soon.

Peter Williams was thrilled to have such an opportunity with Michael. At PSC we regard international exposure as an important facet for enriching the vision of our students. With events like the Obscura Festival and a photography trip to Iran coming up this year, we are excited to hear about the various experiences our students will have.

On the other hand, Michael’s images are being showcased in the Fujifilm X World Photo Gallery – a travelling exhibition which is currently in Tokyo. Fujifilm celebrates the 5th Anniversary of Fujifilm’s X-Series Camera this year and we’re proud that Michael Coyne has the honour of representing PSC at such an important worldwide event.

Australian Art Industry Shines the Spotlight on Another PSC Staff Member: Brie Trenerry

PSC Lecturer Brie Trenerry just presented her work ‘Total Field’ in a solo exhibition at the Australian Experimental Art Foundation (AEAF) in Adelaide, for an entire month from November to mid December.

Brie Tenery: Total Field Screen Installation at AEAF

Brie Trenerry: Total Field Screen Installation at AEAF

The AEAF has been dedicated to new breakthroughs in visual arts since 1974, by artists who wanted to bring about a new approach to art. Believing that art is experimental, reflecting life in certain ways that should be open to public criticism, the AEAF has exhibited works of only prominent artists who are making history with their work and styles. Their focus on research-driven projects that extend themselves to debates and movements in contemporary culture, signifies that Brie’s latest showcase was critical in the current art movement of Australia.

australian-experimental-arts-foundation-70326

Brie Trenerry has specialised in screen-based media since 2002, being a major exhibitor in festivals such as Westspace, White Night, Artspace and has grown her international presence at renowned galleries in cities like Santiago, New York, Berlin and London. Being the co-founder of Moonlight Cinema Adelaide and Kings ARI, Brie has taught video and post production at VCA and RMIT, before coming to PSC. Her project ‘Total Field’ has been described as an ‘experimental installation’ which makes use of cinematic elements. It looks at the relationship between the experience of moving images and altered states of consciousness. Involving concepts such as ‘vertical editing’, Brie experiments with the use of spatial montages and continuity.

Brie Tenerry's Installation at AEAF 2015

Brie Trenerry’s Installation at AEAF 2015

 

Having influential artists as part of our teaching cohort is one of the things that makes the PSC community so special.  This gives students an opportunity to learn from important game-changers in the field of visual arts as they journey into their own careers in photography.  As the nature of the photography industry becomes more technology driven and competitive, students at PSC are constantly encouraged to adapt to new concepts and create work that drives new trends.

PSC Course Director Daniel Boetker-Smith Gets Chosen By Photo-eye USA

PSC’s Bachelor of Photography Course Director, Daniel Boetker Smith, has been chosen by Photo-eye USA to shortlist the best photobooks of 2015. Photo-eye is a prolific journal of international photography excellence and the world’s largest online photography bookstore, based in Santa Fe. For the past 6 years, Photo-eye has put together a multi-contributor list comprising a range of photographers to recommend their favourite books of the year. The hope is to increase awareness of new artists and to allow people in the photography community to discover and explore the published works of artists from around the world.
Daniel Boetker Smith at Fresh15

Daniel Boetker Smith at Fresh15

As most of you already know, Daniel has been the frontrunner of photobook promotions, being the director of the Asia-Pacific Photobook Archive and the co-founder of the Photobook Melbourne Festival. He curates photobooks exhibitions and events internationally, for National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne), Artspace (Sydney), the Museum of Contemporary Art (Sydney), Angkor Photo Festival (Cambodia), Obscura Photo Festival (Malaysia), Aarhus (Denmark), Photo Ireland (Dublin), the Leica Centre (Washington DC) and RayKo Photo Center (San Francisco). Every year PSC Degree students are encouraged to publish their own photobooks for exhibition and presentation. For those who have attended the PSC End of Year Exhibition and more recently the graduate show Thirty One, you would have seen an extensive display of books created by our students.
Students and guests looking at photobooks at PSC's End of the Year Exhibition

Students and guests looking at photobooks at PSC’s End of the Year Exhibition

Photobooks are one of the trends in the current industry that allows students to express strong narratives and stories. At PSC we’re delighted to be at the forefront of this growing trend and excited to have the right people guiding our students in this domain.