Samantha Everton Visits PSC

Our Advanced Diploma of Photography art major students were treated to an artist talk today by Melbourne-based artist Samantha Everton. With incredible attention to detail in her images, Samantha discussed her practice; using a series of hidden wires and support harnesses – every element and movement within her images is captured in-camera.

Samantha Everton, ‘Marionettes’

 

With the students in their final year, Samantha also spoke about how necessary commitment, determination and drive are to sustaining a long-term artistic practice, while also speaking about how she manages her practice as a business.

 

This was an invaluable insight for our final year Advanced Diploma of Photography students! Thank you very much for dropping in Samantha!

See work by our art major students, and please contribute to their Pozible for their end of year exhibition.

Mowanjum Workshop with PSC’s Peter Hatzipavlis

Outside Derby in Western Australia, the Worrorra, Ngarinyin, and Wunumbal tribes make up the Mowanjum community. At the heart of this community is the Mowanjum Aboriginal Art and Culture Centre; a creative hub where old and young come together to create and inspire one another.

 

Mowanjum Festival

 

Next week our very own print master Peter Hatzipavlis, will be travelling to North-Western Australia for a workshop with artists in the community as they respond to the theme of Micro Macro Country. The microscopic and macroscopic interpretations of the Kimberley will be translated through a range of creative mediums, where Peter will develop their processing skills to print contemporary art on merchandise; these products will be sold in the Culture Centre.

We’re incredibly excited and proud to be supporting this workshop! Remember to follow us on Instagram to keep up-to-date on all of the happenings next week!

 

 

Feature Friday 17th May 2017: Marvellous Melbourne

For the 6th year in a row, Melbourne has topped The Economist list of the worlds most liveable cities. (Yay)
Highlighting Melbourne’s love of sport, the arts, it’s beautiful parks and gardens, fashion, festivals, laneways and street-cafe life, transport, shipping industry and it’s distinctive architecture is ‘Marvellous Melbourne- It’s Art and Soul’ exhibition.

With 27 Victorian artists capturing the city in paintings, photographs, drawings and prints; this exhibition on display at the Hilton Melbourne South Wharf is a show of the uniqueness of Melbourne.

 

We’re proud to hear that former PSC students Angela Miller and Hiroki Nagahiro as well as current student James Thorn are involved in this exhibition. Open all day, every day and free of charge, this is a great opportunity to see some work by wonderful artists.

Marvellous Melbourne will be on display from now until May 25th at the Hilton Melbourne South Wharf (2 Convention Centre Place, South Wharf) where it is presented by OzLink Entertainment and Hilton Melbourne South Wharf.

 

 

 

 

Angela Miller

Feature Friday 10th March 2017: Jade Byrnes

No stranger to photo books, Jade Byrnes’ graduating folio ‘Kinglake’ found her as a finalist in the Australian Photo Book of The Year Awards; as well as being nominated for the MACK First Book Award. The documentary series looking at trauma within the landscape, was also exhibited at the Centre for Contemporary Photography where it received the award for Best Self-Published Photo Book.

 

Jade Byrnes, ‘Kinglake’, 2016

 

Jade finished her studies at PSC last year dedicating her year-long folio to Kinglake… 

“Like many other Australian towns, Kinglake; a town located in the shire of Murrindindi 65km north of Melbourne, has a long history of bushfires. It consists of farmland, forests, national parks and a small township. The most recent and severe bushfire that affected the area was the 2009 Black Saturday Bushfire, which took many lives, destroyed more than a hundred-thousand hectares of land and displaced hundreds of people.”

Jade Byrnes, ‘Kinglake’, 2016

“Studies have shown that due to climate change, fires in Victoria, Australia, are more likely to occur every two to three years, rather than every thirty years, as was the case 100 years ago. Kinglake is about the aftermath of fires in the landscape, it traces the trauma and effects on both the land and the people who inhabit it.”

 

Jade Byrnes, ‘Kinglake’, 2016

 

Jade’s work is currently on display at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre at 210 Lonsdale street, Melbourne Monday to Friday 8:30am to 6:30pm for the Month of March.

See more work by Jade

 

 

Thursday Feature 9th March 2017: Agata Mayes

Now in the 3rd stage of the part-time Advanced Diploma course, Agata Mayes has been working on developing her personal style.
Her latest series “Inside The Mind” has been created to explore in-depth, the sensation of unexplained, severe fear.

 

“My recent body of work is not an analysis and does not answer the question “why” but focuses on how it feels  with a complete acceptance of this state. The aim of this work is to return to deeply repressed emotions and past experiences. This is an opportunity for the viewer to revisit “the inside”, reconnect with what is “real” and  abandon the idea of “wrong” which might lead into a personal interpretation.”

 

Agata Mayes, ‘Inside The Mind’, 2016

 

Born in Poland, and after living in Italy and England where she completed studies in informatics in 2003, Agata moved to Australia in 2011. Her passion for photography lead her to short courses and workshops before she finally decided to take up part-time study with PSC’s Advanced Diploma course. Before arriving at PSC to refine her technical skills and the conceptual understanding of photographic art, Agata won the “Kayell Best Commercial Work” at the Centre for Contemporary Photography salon in 2015, and was already actively involved in the photographic community 6 years earlier.

“I am an artist with an interest in psychology and my work reflects how I see the world. My aim is to study the human mind, explore the subject of ego and to understand what makes us who we are. My ultimate goal is to create something timeless which will remain as evidence of my life once I leave my body form.”

 

Agata Mayes, ‘Inside The Mind’, 2016

 

Agata Mayes’ series “Inside The Mind” is on display at the Queen Victoria Womens Centre for the month of March, open from 8:30am to 6:30pm Monday-Friday at 210 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne.

Follow Agata on Instagram

 

Tuesday Feature 7th March 2017: Emma Watson

Completing the Bachelor course last year, majoring in art; Emma Watson is set to graduate from PSC this May. Emma’s work will also be on display at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre for the month of March. Be sure to go see it along with other students‘ who are involved in the exhibition ‘Elements‘.

Emma Watson, ‘Folding’ 2016

 

Currently working as a freelance photographer, her monochromatic work is quietly spoken and very personal. It focuses on themes of memory, mental illness, family and identity. Drawing from past and present experiences she uses her camera to escape from her mind and to help make sense of her place in society.

Emma’s graduating folio ‘Folding’ revolves around her relationship with her family as she comes to deal with depression and a new family dynamic.

 

 

For my entire childhood I’ve grown up with the most loving, connected, family bond one can ever imagine; where everything has always felt so secure and safe, a sanctuary where all the corrupt things the world generates can’t touch you, or in other words, a safe embassy I’ve always seeked asylum in.

On the 17th of August 11:15 am I was diagnosed with clinical depression. My emotional reserves are completely empty. I find myself wanting to cry everyday and everything overwhelms me. The more depressed and lonely I get, the more I isolate myself from the outside world diminishing my motivation to reach out to people. Delivering this news to my family is still to this day, the coldest and cruelest moment I’ve ever shared with them.

I used to think life-changing news brought people closer together. Yet for some reason I found myself feeling more and more distant and isolated than ever before. It’s so difficult now to decode the reality. When my family surrounds me, I feel this overwhelming sense of distance and disregard on their behalf. I hear the sound of the cracks forming between us and growing bigger every day, but it’s so unclear to understand the cause of this breaking.

Is my family still there for me and I just can’t see it anymore. Or are they trying to reach out to me and I’m choosing to run away.

All of this coincided with my last year of photographic studies and I decided to use my camera to explore this very new to me family dynamic. So, I started interfering with my history; I cropped out family photos, covered aspects of my home and became the perpetrator of fading certain memories.
My camera brought me closer to my family roots. I scrambled through our lines to reconnect with the way things used to be. But I’m ultimately using this body of work as a way to communicate with my family.

 

 

See More of Emma’s work 

Emma Watson, ‘Folding’, 2016

Monday Feature 6th March 2017: Rochelle Hansen

Completing the bachelor course last year, Rochelle Hansen is set to graduate this May from PSC.

Based in Melbourne as a documentary photographer, much of Rochelle’s work explores our relationship with nature as she pushes to blur the line between art and documentary photography. Through stillness and a kind of sedative process, Rochelle intends to capture the collision between humankind and the natural world. Using photographs as a token of absence and a way of reconnecting the lost and forgotten relationship once shared with Earth and it’s inhabitants.

 

By combining strength and movement, horses have the ability to effortlessly floor across the arena in a kind of poetic dance- that sees human and horse uniting on the stage, engaged in an intimate communication barely visible to an audience. 
‘Two’ Documents the relationship built between human and horse within the training process. I have worked with trainers who utilise positive training techniques and focus on creating partnerships built on trust and respect.

 

Rochelle’s work is a part of the ‘Elements’ exhibition at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre at 210 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne

 

 

 

 

Rochelle Hansen, ‘Two’

Graduate Michael Embelton

We are very happy to hear from one of our graduates; Michael Embelton who completed the Advanced Diploma part time and is now working in architectural and product photography.

We sat down with Michael to have a chat with him about his experience here, and what he is doing now.

 

 

What got you started in photography?

I spent 4 years traveling and found taking photographs a great way to meet the locals and learn about the culture. I am quite shy so it gave me an excuse to engage others.

 

Why did you decide to study at PSC?

I had been working all my life for architectural design firms in one capacity or another but was no longer fulfilled. I then started photographing the projects I worked on, and really enjoyed it, so one day I walked out of the office and never went back.

The best decision I ever made.

 

How did PSC help get you where you are today?

There are a lot of photographers out there that went to PSC and understand if you graduate you will have a good understanding of the basics of photography and have something to offer as an assistant

The best thing about PSC is working with like-minded enthusiastic people.

 

How do you balance your commercial and personal work?

A majority of my work is architectural, and product photography, so I try to do at least one personal job a month. They range from fashion, to folio shoots, but the ones I really like are the unusual ones, like suspending models from scaffolding, or shibari (you’ll have to look that up).

 

What are you working on at the moment?

My next shoot is a Vogue style lingerie editorial and an outdoor version of my suspension shoot. I am also building a studio at home. I have finished the  MUA studio, change room, and cyclorama, and am now working on a number of different walls to use a backdrops.

My idea is to be able to offer a choice of backdrops all at the one place. i.e. cyclorama, old and new timber, brick, venetian blinds, etc. as well as outside locations.

 

Who and/or what inspires you?

Absolutely everything.

I am always writing down ideas. After a while you tend to see the world TTL. My greatest inspiration comes from the passion of others. Whether it be, models, MUA’s, or actors, everyone inspires each other. Photography can be lonely sometimes, so when you get an opportunity to collaborate, take it.

 

What has been the most rewarding part of your career so far?

Doing what I love and surrounding myself with creative people. Everyone has a story, it is your job to find it and bring it to the surface.

 

What advice would you give to current PSC students or people thinking of enrolling at PSC?

  • Shoot as often as possible.
  • Always push the boundaries.
  • Don’t just take 200 shots and hope that one turns out, pretend your using film and make each shot count.
  • You learn from your failures, so do not be afraid to fail.
  • Never say ‘I will fix that in photoshop!’
  • Shoot self portraits.
  • Less is always better.
  • Marketing is everything.

 

 

See more of Michael’s work

 

 

 

 

2016 Advanced Diploma Graduate Tim Allen featured on Creative Review

One of our 2016 Advanced Diploma graduates; Tim Allen, has had his work featured on Creative Review!!

 

The series ‘Construct’ explores the effect of industrialisation on the earth. From a height of 1500ft and 3000ft, the images show construction and road-work sites as well as other industrial environments in and around Melbourne. While the images make the sites look quite impressive, they’re also highlighting the destructive effects of human activity. 

Tim is now based in the Netherlands, see more of his work here