Feature Friday; Anthony Mayze

The Australian Professional Photography Awards are coming up, which means our students are now preparing their state award-winning images for the national competition.

One such student is Anthony Mayze who studies the Advanced Diploma of Photography. Now with an incredible achievement of three silver awards, Anthony sat down to have a quick chat about his journey so far at PSC.

 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

 

Where did your interest in photography start? 
I joined studio arts in high-school which led me to focus on seascape photography as well as some astrophotography and I grew my love from there.
Back when you started at PSC, did you have an idea of what sort of photographer you wanted to become?
I had no idea where I wanted my photography to lead me, but always thought that I would alway choose a commercial path.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned up to this point?
The most beneficial lesson in life is; what ever you put in, you get out, so always try your hardest. Photographic-wise would have to be learning to project emotions and personality into my work.
What has been your most challenging moment at PSC so far?
 My most challenging moment at PSC would have to be the folios; having a short time to execute everything and then to present it was rather difficult but I have always managed to prevail!
What about your most rewarding moment so far? 
My most rewarding moment would have to be when I won a silver award in the VIPPY awards.
How has your style changed? Have you noticed anything different? Your aesthetic? Way of thinking? Approach?
I have noticed that I am putting more consciousness behind my images in terms of looking out for distractions, as well as looking at ways to put my own twist on images. I have also realised that I love simplicity in my work.
So far, what body of work are you most proud of?
My trimester 4 folio on personal experiences with stress, frustration and sadness.

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

What are you working on now?
 I’m about to start working on building from my ‘Stress, Frustration and Sadness’ concept with editorial fashion techniques.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photos I’m either working, spending too much money with friends or watching Netflix.
Where do you find your motivation?
 I find my motivation everywhere, whether it be a film or in life I can always find ways that sparks my imagination.
What or who inspires you?
Two major inspirations in the photographic world are Annie Leibovitz and Gregory Crewdson, their work is amazing. Another huge inspiration is my Nan who always wished for me to hold on to my dreams until I have achieved them
What is your dream job?
Ever since starting my journey in photography, my dream shoot has always been to recreate scenes from Beauty and the Beast with a Gregory Crewdson style.
 To stay up-to-date with Anthonys work, follow him on Instagram! 

Anthony Mayze, 2017, (AIPP Victorian silver award)

Friday Feature; Emily Skelton

Currently in her second-last semester at PSC, Advanced Diploma of Photography student Emily Skelton is already setting up her career; working with her local football club, as well as becoming a well-known figure around her hometown of Bacchus Marsh.

We caught up with Emily to learn more about her journey so far.

 

 

Emily Skelton

 

 

 

When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 

At the end of year 12 and the start of PSC I had this idea of being a famous fashion photographer, the one who takes incredible Vogue cover shots. I wanted to control the day, the shoot and get all creative, but as I started to learn at PSC it was becoming harder for me to see that for myself. My ideas started to change, I still wanted to do really creative things, but I wanted to be able to capture moments people would have for a lifetime.

 

What got you started in photography?

My mum and dad handing me a 35mm camera at the age of 2. That’s how it started, taking photos for mum and dad when they wanted to be in the picture. Mum has a particular photo in an album at home of herself and my sister, under the photo the caption says “photo by Emily”; I was 2.
I was never was really good at English and Math at school, so art was always my favourite subject. I was a very good painter, but I realise now that whenever we went out I would end up with the camera in my hands and I would be taking photos of everything from the ground, to the plants, to my family. Then as I got older I wanted to do more, so I would plan out photoshoots and get my friends to model for me. I still remember the first photoshoot I did; I borrowed a Canon camera off a friend, I pinned a white sheet up in my grandmothers granny flat with my friends in front of it wearing white t-shirts. We had bright-coloured paint and used it to paint my friends hands, then print it onto their face. I loved it and that for me was the beginning of everything, but I wanted more.

 

What has been your most rewarding moment at PSC?

Not that I’m big on grades and all, but receiving a mark which I didn’t think I would get really showed me that if I push myself more I can truly achieve what I want. Being a part of open days and career expos has also been really rewarding too, as I can tell people my story and my experience here, as well as being able to meet potential students and make new friends.

 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned? 

Before I came to PSC I was self-taught; I shot jpegs in my backyard on a little Sony camera. I have benefited  from everything; starting with the basic stuff in first-year, to all the studio set-up now. I have learned how to capture an image with the correct light and what angles to shoot from, I have learned how to use my camera and control it so I can get the very best out of images. If you had told my high-school self this, I would not have believed you at all. This course and school has changed me for the better, I have grown so much in my work and myself and I have truly found something I love.

 

 

Emily Skelton

 

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?

Everything has been challenging in its own way and of course some things will be harder than others, some things take more time to learn, or sometimes you don’t have an idea and you have to work with what you’ve got and go for it.

 

What are you working on at the moment? 

At the moment I’m working on lots! I’m shooting every Saturday for the Bacchus Marsh Cobras (local footy club) which is a thing I keep growing and manage to get a new angle every week. I’m also working on building up my clients by shooting a few weddings. I have done a few jobs that have been printed onto glass and have now been installed into peoples new kitchens. I am always working on the next creative shoot I could be doing. It’s a good thing I have two sisters; one that wants to be a special effects makeup-artist, and the other who wants to be model. We are always coming up with new ideas and things we can work on together.

 

Where do you find your motivation?

Myself, and my life which includes my family and friends, as well as any events that happen.

 

Emily Skelton

 

Where do you want to take your photography?

Everywhere! I want to take it from within my hometown to overseas. I want to create or capture moments. As long as I’m creating and exploring the world with my camera; I’ll be happy. I want my photos to help people remember their moments in life because if you have an image, you know you’re not going to forget it.

 

Who/what inspires you?

Everything inspires me; I draw elements of life events into my work, from random creative ideas that happen to personal things that have happened. Watching movies also give me ideas as does the music I listen to.

 

How has your style developed?

Well my style has developed from shooting with natural light, with a white sheet in my backyard (which I still do) to setting up studio lights and controlling everything. My style has grown with me and we both have changed over the years as I try to find myself and where I belong in the photography world.

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?

I’m either at my local cafe with friends drinking coffee, or I’m at home sleeping, but sometimes I work with my dad.

 

What advice would you give to current students?

You can make it! Keep pushing and build up your foilo, believe in yourself and just keep working hard because hard work can get you anywhere.

 

 

 

To keep up to date with Emily, follow her on Instagram 

 

Emily Skelton

Mac Lawrence in British Journal of Photography

The sixth edition of the Talent Issue by the British Journal of Photography features one of our recent fine art graduates; Mac Lawrence.

What got you started in photography?
My early interests in photography started many years ago as away to mainly document my surroundings. Pretty banal kind of images   of my day to day, lots of photos of friends and family that kind of thing. More diaristic I guess.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 
Well before studying I just wanted to be able to use photography as a way to share stories. Through learning about the language of photography my interests and understanding became more focused.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned? 
It’s important to take the time to learn from your failures.

Mac Lawrence, ‘Hidden Dispositions’, 2016

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
Being able to push through stagnating self-criticism.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Seeing all the hard work that everyone put in throughout the final year coming together on display at the graduate exhibition.
How has your style developed?
I would say through spending time reflecting and visually analysing the things I feel work and don’t work in the pictures I’m making. Asking myself if the pictures are saying the things I want them to, and thinking about why that is. If I’m making photographs that don’t seem to be working I try to digest them and understand where the issues are. I also learn a lot from the works of others that I find interesting and thinking about why I engage with their work. I don’t feel I have any one specific style and I try to challenge myself with new approaches. I try not to limit myself to just shooting film, or digital or only black and white or whatever it is, I just try to focus on what feels right for the work I’m making.
What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
It’s bout ideas of masculinity and representation in Australia. It’s quite a personal work, which developed through self-reflection and engaging with the social dialogue.

Mac Lawrence, ‘Hidden Dispositions’, 2016

What are you working on at the moment? 
Still focusing on ideas of masculinity I’m currently writing proposals to exhibit a new work, which is in development, hoping to be able to show that somewhere in Melbourne. Also spending a lot of my time finalising a collaborative work with Sarah Walker, which is being exhibited at junior Space gallery in Collingwood towards the end of June. I’ll be heading to Malaysia for a bit shortly after that to help out my friends at Obscura Festival of Photography. 
What advice would you give to current students?
Embrace the process. Rome wasn’t built in a day. Taking a photograph is just one step in the process of making a cohesive body of work. In my final year I learnt just as much from making c**p photos as I did making ones that were interesting.

Mac Lawrence, ‘Hidden Dispositions’, 2016

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
Most of my days are spent in my studio, which is not too far from my house in Brunswick. Each day is different; one day might be spent doing research or writing and others my focus might be spent working on files, making prints, planning shoot logistics etc.… I work for the man during my nights so I try to have a routine to my days to breed good creative habits, being in the studio at specific times helps that. Having structure in my practice is really important.
Where do you find your motivation?
Seeing development in my work, which drives me to reach my personal goals, motivates me.
Who/what inspires you?
Lots of things, I get a lot of inspiration from seeing the hard work others around me are doing. I try to surround myself with people that are have a ‘can to attitude’ and don’t try to complicate their lives by focusing to much on hurdles in front of them.

 

See more of Mac’s work on his website here.

 

 

Mac Lawrence, ‘Hidden Dispositions’, 2016

Feature Friday; Mathew Molloy

Today (May 26th) we caught up with former PSC student Mathew Molloy who is currently in Europe with his camera.

 

 

Mathew Molloy

 

 

What got you started in photography? 
I always loved photography as a kid but never had the chance to do anything about it. When I returned to Australia after living abroad I had the chance and decided to jump in and give it a go.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 
I think at that stage I was just hoping that I could be a professional photographer shooting anything, but I love shooting people so it was always going to be related around fashion and portraits.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned? 
I think to take nothing for granted in life or in your career, the smallest thing can impact both be it positive or negative. It’s how you respond to that action that will set you apart.

 

Mathew Molloy

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
I was studying part time and to be honest the photography side of things I always felt in control of, but the lack of time to polish off a concept to the standard I would be happy to submit was the tough one, and I do admit that work was submitted that I wouldn’t want to be seen today.

What was your most rewarding moment at PSC? 
I don’t know that I can pinpoint one moment, but the most rewarding moments for me were looking at a folio first presented to my classmates and comparing it to a completed folio at the end of semester and taking in the transformation.

How has your style developed?
Everyone tends to put a lot of emphasis on style in photography. I like to shoot clean, crisp images, is that a style? Maybe, maybe not. I would like to think my style is adaptable to my clients needs.

 

Mathew Molloy

What are you working on at the moment? 
I have just completed back to back fashion weeks in Europe and now have a few editorial shoots for a spring/summer magazine publications.

What do you do when you’re not taking photos? 
Look at photos other photographers have taken, I know, soooo bad!
I love to travel and spending time with my family.
Where do you find your motivation?
On the street in everyday situations. Seeing the little old lady crossing the road holding hands with her hunched over husband, both so neatly dressed. Taking in the architecture when I go for a walk. Going to art galleries, Instagram, everywhere.

Who/What inspires you?
In regards to photography, there are so many great fashion photographers like Richard Avedon, but I tend to be more inspired by photographers like Khalil Hamra, who is trying to make a difference for his people and country by taking pictures that tell a story of change needed. James Nachtwey is also amazing and much more recognised, both as equally brave and courageous.

 

See more of Mathew’s work! 

 

 

Matthew Molloy

2017 Graduate Feature: Sonja Broersen

Two days until graduation!!

 

Today let’s have a quick chat with graduating art photographer Sonja Broersen;

 

Sonja Broersen, 2016

 

Who and/or what inspires you?
I’m inspired by the physical space around me, the body I inhabit and how the two exist in relation to one another.
What was your graduating folio about?
My graduating folio was a reflection on my experience with femininity, and my attempt to better understand my conflicting thoughts around female identity.

Sonja Broersen, 2016

What are you working on at the moment?
Lately I’ve been experimenting with other creative outlets and how I can eventually tie them back into my photographic practice. At the moment I’ve been playing with textile work, and plan to try other mediums such as sculpture.
What has been the most rewarding part of your career so far?
Having the opportunity to be around other like-minded people throughout this course has been incredibly rewarding. Being surrounded by people who share the same passion and interest in photography has really solidified my own understanding of why I was pursuing a career in art photography.
To see more of Sonja’s work, take a look at her website!

Sonja Broersen, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Rachel Hickey

To kick off our last week of graduate features, we’re catching up with photojournalist Rachel Hickey to hear more abut her time at PSC.

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Hey Rachel, what got you started in photography?
I’m not sure if there was a particular moment that inspired me… But I realised photography was a part of me when I wore out my first camera, a point and shoot Olympus. I was obsessed with images, always trying to get a different perspective and do something different. Actually, I remember the first ever photography job I did was on that little camera; it was at our local racecourse, photographing the horse racing. I had no idea what I was doing, but running from place to place and meeting new people was incredibly exciting and at the end of the day, to have a story of the events and little details that so many people would have missed was really an honour.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 
Ha! I was convinced that I would be a stills photographer for films. However I have never once been on a movie set.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
The worst someone can ever say is no.
I have learned to accept that no one sees the same thing in the exact same way, I have also learned to not be pressured by “should”. That is when people say “You should photograph like that” or “You should do that”.

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
 To be honest; going through a breakup three weeks before a folio was due when that was my subject matter, was possibly the most stressful.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Presenting my final folio and being genuinely proud of myself and the amount of dedication and persistence I put in to every single image. It was an overwhelming moment of emotion when I realised I had presented my last ever folio at PSC- huge accomplishment!
How has your style developed?
My style is always developing. It started with being very formally composed, but it’s now more focused on details of something to add insight to the larger picture, without actually showing the larger picture. I like to think it’s less biased in that sense.
What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio ‘Beyond Bikes’ is looking deep into the community of cycling, specifically track racing. I grew up around cycling and after moving to Melbourne, I noticed whenever I was talking to non-cycling friends about the velodrome and the thrill of riding that they didn’t have any idea of what I was going on about. I wanted to show that there is more to cycling than bikes.

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

What are you working on at the moment? 
I’m brainstorming ideas for new projects, but also taking some time away from the camera to broaden my eye. In saying that I am a part of the PSC Alumni in which we hope to have a group exhibition in the next couple of months. I’m also doing a bit of freelancing.
What advice would you give to current students?
Have a go! You are in the best environment to learn and make mistakes, don’t be concerned that anyone will ever think less of you because you don’t know everything about photography. Go ahead and make the mistakes.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I love to ride my bike! Either on the velodrome or on the road.
Where do you find your motivation?
From being around like-minded people, that is something I loved about PSC.
Who/what inspires you?
Looking at other photographers’ work and not limiting myself. Thinking about future possibilities is huge inspiration for me, it makes me look a little more internally to what I actually want to do.
What is your dream job/shoot?
I would love the opportunity to photograph a professional cycling race team for a season. I also dream of/plan on living in Europe or Canada and creating smaller bodies of work in my downtime.
To see more of Rachel’s work, check out her website! 

 

 

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

Rachel Hickey, ‘Beyond Bikes’, 2016

 

2017 Graduate Feature; Tayla Nuss Soeharto

Today we are catching up with Australian Student Photographer of the year (2016), Tayla Nuss Soeharto; learning about her journey in photography, and what she is up to now after winning the highest award a photography student can get in Australia.

 

 

Tayla Nuss Soeharto, 2016

 

What got you started in photography? 
I still don’t really know what sparked my interest in photography, but I think it all began when my mum gave me her film camera and sifting through all the photographic memories she captured with it when I was growing up. I then bought my own little point and shoot from an op shop around the corner and started taking photos of my sister with it and experimenting with film and double exposures.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
At the time I was really interested in analogue photography so I guess I was expecting to make progress with film techniques and develop my style through that. However, even though I still enjoy using film, I think the digital world won me over!
How has your style developed?
Looking back through my work, I have always used a lot of colour in my images and been very interested in objects, especially ones found in the everyday household. All the series I made while at PSC were also set up in some kind of way, either in a studio setting or around the house. Compared to my early works, my lighting technique is much more resolved and my images are a lot cleaner. Throughout my studies I began working with fashion students, which has slowly warmed me up to the idea of photographing people and not just objects.

Tayla Nuss Soeharto, 2016

What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I’m working with a few RMIT fashion students and taking photos for their publication, as well as starting a mini out-of-space inspired still life series, which is still a work in progress!
What advice would you give to current students?
Don’t be afraid to show all of your work in progress images even if you hate all of them, they can be the beginning of something brilliant!
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
I intern at The Photo Studio two days a week, work my casual job and watch weird space videos every now and then.

Tayla Nuss Soeharto, 2016

Where do you find your motivation?
I mostly pull inspiration from the random things around me or things that I watch.
What is your dream job/shoot?
My dream shoot would be to collaborate with American artists Alex Wallbaum and Aleia Murawski on some kind of fun and whacky still life project.
Who/what inspires you?
I sometimes get in a mood where everything inspires me, like a colour, a piece of fruit, or a weird object and i just need to set something up and photograph it!
To see more of Tayla’s work, check out her website

Tayla Nuss Soeharto, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Jarred Mullenger

Today we are featuring graduating art photographer Jarred Mullenger, Jarred is our second 2017 graduate to be featured in Son Of A Gun Magazine. We caught up with Jarred to find out more about his connection to photography and his graduating folio “It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown”.

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

What attracted you to photography?
Well I was always a creative person growing up. Anything creative that used imagination and was out of the ordinary I was drawn to. I started off sketching. While everyone else was outside playing at lunchtime, I was in the art room having drawing lessons. It was my time to escape the routines of school and let my imagination run free. Moving forward a handful of years, I discovered the film camera and the darkroom; then my lunchtimes continued to be spent inside developing film and experimenting in the darkroom, so that’s where the interest in photography started.

 

Did you have an idea when you first started at PSC of the kind of photographer  you wanted to become?
I envisioned becoming the complete opposite to what I am today. I always imagined being a fashion photographer for magazines and runway and then slowly moving into being a designer.

 

What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
Accepting uniqueness and allowing time to grow.

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

 

 

What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
Overcoming self doubt, growing a voice and being confident in my own unique practice.

 

What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
Making a strong group of friends that all share the same interest, teachers included! My confidence in my practice and also myself has grown a lot, as well as having a strong final series that I’m proud of.

 

 

How has your style developed?
My style has developed immensely and will always continue to do so. Through years of experimenting and questioning everything you’re doing and through trial and error your style will change naturally.

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

 

 

What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
The work I presented for the final folio focussed on the family dynamics in my house and interprets my view on the family aura in my household, looking at the changes that have occurred over time. I focussed on the strong female presence in the house following the separation of my parents and the repercussions it’s had on myself. Through this project I have begun to accept the disconnect that has established over time and now looking into the future for what lies ahead outside of the four walls I call home.

Unconsciously all my previous work had been very personal or a reflection of myself without me intentionally doing so, so I wanted to flip that around and see what would happen if I made work that is a self reflection of myself and go from there.

 

 

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m continuing with my final folio work which has the potential for me to work on for am lifetime, so who knows.

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

 

What advice would you give to current students?
You only get out as much as you put in!

 

What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When my mind is not on photography, it’s either on fashion, family and friends, or being with nature.

 

Where do you find your motivation?
Motivation comes from a lot of things; everyday mundane activities can cause me to get a possible image in my end which I create into a digital image over time. Seeing other people succeed helps me stay motivated to achieve at the same level.

 

Who/what inspires you?
Friends and the family, the changes in our environment and other more established photographers.

 

What is your dream job/shoot?
Being a renowned artist exhibiting unique and personal work at a high standard in galleries locally and also internationally.

 

 

Follow Jarred and his ongoing work on his Instagram

 

 

Jarred Mullenger, ‘It’s 11am And I’m Still In My Dressing Gown’, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Shannon MacKenzie

Feature Friday!! Today we are catching up with Shannon MacKenzie who studied commercial photography at PSC.

 

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

 

What got you started in photography?
I started in photography because I needed to get out of my career as a criminologist and felt my art was confining me indoors. I wanted to get out into the world and see beauty.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become? 
When I first started at PSC I imagined I would become a wedding photographer. A new career with beauty and happiness.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
The main thing I learnt was photography can be fine art, I was inspired by readings and constructive advise from one teacher, even if it was negative.
What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The most challenging time I had at PSC was staying true to me, it’s easy to get lost or intimidated by others work.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
The most rewarding moment at PSC was gaining my idol as my mentor.
I have moved so far away from an aspiring wedding photographer it’s unbelievable what I can achieve through a camera lens instead of on canvas.

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was about social demographics and how we portray ourselves in public where we receive such criticism but behind closed doors we all live the same, we are one society. I came to this idea after looking into what the census was about.
What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I am back in criminology work and working on forensic photography. I am also laying down the initial sketches for a mixed media art/photography exhibition by spring.
What advice would you give to current students?
Experiment with all avenues of photography and pick the one that feels right and gets your creative side pushing you to do more. Stay true to that and aim for your work to shine.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photo’s I study for my master’s and work. But I’m always planning.

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

Where do you find your motivation?
My motivation is everywhere. It can be a moment that makes you take note or turn back to get this image on your phone while taking down a note of time and place. I have gone from wedding to surrealism but still have that element of beauty.
Who/what inspires you?
I’m inspired by my mentor Brooke Shaden, she understands the way I see things and I understand her direction.
What is your dream job?
My dream job would be to create a large piece of work for a corporate/commercial/cultural buildings foyer.
To follow Shannon’s work on Instagram click here

Shannon MacKenzie, ‘Jodie’, 2016

2017 Graduate Feature; Morgan Hancock

Today’s graduate feature is photojournalist Morgan Hancock who has taken up a position at The Standard; a fairfax newspaper delivering the latest news and events in Warrnambool and south-west Victoria. We asked him a few questions about his time at PSC and now working in the industry straight out of study.

Morgan Hancock, 2016

What got you started in photography?
I got started in photography during high school, I took it as an elective as I had always enjoyed taking photos, during the school year I quickly realised how much I loved photography, and the creative scope that it allowed for.
When you first started at PSC, what kind of photographer did you imagine you would become?
When I first started at PSC, I imagined that I would become an all round better photographer. I had always enjoyed photographing sport so I wanted to see myself as a sport photographer, having completed my degree it made me a better photographer in every aspect.
What is the most beneficial thing you have learned?
PSC taught me a lot of time management skills, as well as thinking outside of the box which is ultra important in the photography industry.

Morgan Hancock

 What was your most challenging moment at PSC?
The most challenging moment at PSC would be the very beginning; I found it quite hard to get my head around all of the new aspects, including thinking of a folio, getting used to how PSC works and getting to know all of the new faces.
What was your most rewarding moment at PSC?
The most rewarding part was right at the end, when it was possible to have a look at the folio that I had created in the final year, which was a culmination of hard work over the prior years.
How has your style developed?
My photographic style has developed into a lot more of a documentary style. When I first began, I had attempted to create documentary works, however at the end of the three years my style was certainly a lot clearer.
 What was your graduating folio about? How did you arrive at this idea?
My graduating folio was based around spending a year inside a football club; this came about from my huge passion for football, and the simple fact that it quite often isn’t documented in such a way.
What are you working on at the moment?
I am currently working at the Warrnambool Standard as a photographer, I am also working on some personal projects on the side; ranging from more sport photography work, to photographing abandoned sites.

Morgan Hancock

What advice would you give to current students?
I would tell them to enjoy the challenge, and make the most of being able to choose their own folio ideas.
What do you do when you’re not taking photos?
When I’m not taking photo’s there is a high chance that I will be off watching sport, or exploring a new place.
Where do you find your motivation?
I find motivation from constantly looking at other photographers work; I love spending time looking through world class photographers’ photos. Nothing motivates me more than flicking through a magazine or Instagram, and seeing images that I can have the opportunity to create.
Who/what inspires you?
I am mainly inspired by the dream that I can one day spend my time traveling and photographing sport, whilst creating jaw dropping images.
What is your dream job/shoot?
My long term goal has always been to work at a newspaper and/or an agency like Getty Images. My dream shoot would be the opportunity to cover the Olympic Games.
See more of Morgan’s work here on his website 

Morgan Hancock