PSC’s Mid Year Exhibition of 2016 Exudes with Fresh Talent

The work exhibited at PSC keeps getting more exciting and eye-popping, as the years progress. If you haven’t visited our Mid Year Exhibition this year, you must rush yourself to 65 City Road to get a burst of inspiration this very moment! We have a diverse range of students exhibiting, from the first to final year of the Creative Certificate, Pro Certificate, Advanced Diploma and Bachelor degree. Seeing all stages of student work which cover every area of photography such as travel, documentary, photojournalism, fashion, lifestyle, food, portrait and landscape, is a rare occasion. Furthermore, the exhibition will only be on for a limited time.

Here’s a sneak peak of some of the brilliant work being showcased:

Aaron Walker is a professional photographer with a fifteen year career in the arts industry as an international aerial performer, circus trainer and show consultant. He recently had his own solo exhibition at Watch This Space Gallery in Sydney and received rave reviews from Arts Review, which you can read about here. Keep up to date with Aaron’s work and enjoy a bedazzling journey of striking photographs.

Pier Carthew is a fashion photographer who has always wanted to push the boundaries of the genre and produce new, stunning images. Being a former theatre actor who now photographs stage shows, performers and productions, Pier’s photography is injected with a sense of heightened drama. If you come by PSC, be sure to see Pier’s work the moment you enter our foyer!

Photojournalist Rochelle Hansen, specialises in travel – culture and equine photography, having exhibited her show-stopping work at the Kapow! Exhibition in 2015, the CCP Salon in 2015 and 2014, and has been the recipient of the Mason Family Arts Bursary for 3 years in a row since 2014. Follow Rochelle @rochellehansenphotography.

Proud to have her work up for the Mid Year Exhibition, Sally Kaack is a traveller and storyteller, capturing the true essence of urban culture all around the world. Check out her Instagram channel to slip into a colourful world that pulsates with vibrance and adventure.

Fine art photographer, Sarah Walker is one of our prized Bachelor degree students who has carved out a niche for herself in terms of showcasing thought-provoking work. She has been published by Son of a Gun Magazine, The Latent Image and has achieved a lot of success at the Melbourne Art Book Fair (2016), the Obscura Photography Festival in Penang (2015) and soon will be met with much praise at her upcoming exhibition at the Besser Gallery.

 

Be sure to check out our Mid Year Exhibition and find out about how you can be a part of PSC with our last part time course intake of the year, starting on 31 August.

 

PSC Grad Sarah Lynch Gets Showcased in New York City

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If you’re following our Instagram channel, you are probably already blown away by the amazing photographs of New York city, taken by a certain ‘@focus_on_humanity’. Our channel has been taken over by an amazingly prolific graduate of 2013, Sarah Lynch.

After completing her degree, she received the prestigious Heartfelt Award for using photography to make a difference – something that she’s still dedicated to. She began her own not-for-profit organisation, Focus on Humanity, which  is driven towards giving remote communities access to the art and medium of photography. It serves to make portraits for families and individuals, training people to learn the craft so that they can record their own experiences and express their views through the language of photography.

Image from 'Focus on Humanity' website

Image from ‘Focus on Humanity’ website

Recently been offered her own solo exhibition space in the cultural capital of New York in 2018, Sarah’s work is currently being showcased at the Agora Gallery (New York) in an exhibition titled, ‘Out From Down Under & Beyond: Fine Art from Australia & New Zealand’. Featuring artists from Oceania, the exhibition’s main focus is Sarah’s ongoing photography series from 2014 where she shot the volcanic landscapes of New Zealand:

‘The series aims to draw the viewers into the otherworldly landscapes; to see the world through an alternative perspective from the one they usually do, with the hope that they will be enchanted by the world and its beauty and something worth saving and fighting for. The images are not the usual environmentalist landscapes that viewers may be used to seeing but it is my hope that if people can become entranced with nature then they may take up the cause to protect it.’

Image by Sarah Lynch

Image by Sarah Lynch

This is a great opportunity for Sarah to get more international recognition for her work, as the Agora Gallery is based in the most prized fine art district of New York and is largely frequented by dealers, collectors and curators. The exhibition will be on till the 9th of June and you can view as well as purchase some of her limited edition prints from the ARTmine page.

Image taken by The Hippy and the Blonde Facebook page

Image taken by The Hippy and the Blonde Facebook page


Aside from her busy exhibition schedule, Sarah also launched an adventure-blog with another PSC graduate, Ruth Perry. You can visit their ‘Hippy and the Blonde’ Facebook page, Instagram channel and blog have a look at their wonderful travels around America!

We’re really happy to hear about our graduates leading such exciting lives and using their photography to inspire and reach out to people across the world. It’s great to know that our graduates are getting the success they deserve in the world of photography.

Graduating and Earning Recognition

Exactly a week before graduating with her Bachelor’s degree, emerging photographer/publisher Clare Steele, was in charge of PSC’s very own photobook exhibition stall at the National Gallery of Victoria Art Book fair of 2016. Third year students Sophie Pigram, Olivia Mroz, Sarah Walker, Mac Lawrence, Nathan Larkin and Lucie McGough were involved in selling photobooks – all of which were created and published by them and their fellow classmates.

There were more than 71 stalls during the weekend of April 29 to May 1 – with photobooks made by Nathan Larkin, Olivia Mroz and Clare Steele selected by the National Library of Australia for their permanent collection.

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Image of Clare Steele at the National Gallery of Victoria, by Daniel Boetker Smith

Clare Steele was excited to be at the event, as she always looks forward to getting feedback from interested audiences who are keen to find out more about the thought processes behind the books. Clare loves being part of the photobook community, thanks to her course at PSC where she was introduced to the particular area of the industry. After publishing her first photobook for her final folio piece last year, she has gone on to publish more work on her own, submitting them to international competitions.

“I very much appreciate the amazing photographers/curators/writers (Katrin Koenning, Hoda Afshar, Pippa Milne, Daniel Boetker-Smith) who have enlightened me and opened my eyes to what photography can be, and given me the rare opportunity to have complete creative freedom to work really hard on my project. Likewise, receiving great feedback and support for that work while also being informed about the difficulties real-world photographers face.”

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Clare plans to travel to Ireland and be a part of Photo Ireland – thanks to the industry connections facilitated by teacher Katrin Koenning.

“I’m looking forward to the chance of sharing and talking about my work to those who’ve never seen it before, hearing their different views and interpretations… to travel and open my eyes even more, while always improving my craft and continue to develop photographic series from stories I’m passionate about.”

We are proud of Clare and are excited to see her graduate this Friday, May 6 !

Emma McEvoy stuns Melbourne with ‘Sand Castles’

Last week, our very own PSC graduate (of the Advanced Diploma and Pathways program) showcased breathtaking work in the most unique space in the world. Emma McEvoy created a series around her trip to an abandoned diamond mining town in the heart of Namibia and exhibited her work in a house that was about to be demolished, in Melbourne’s quirky capital of Fitzroy. Filling up the house with sand to recreate the experience she had in Namibia, crowds of visitors were astonished by the creative presentation and the glorious work of Emma’s that was presented on the walls.

The exhibition was only open for four days and this was enough to get the attention of the most influential media names in the world. Here is a quick kaleidoscope of the wonder behind Emma McEvoy’s recent work (click to play):

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Emma was also interviewed by PSC senior fellow and award winning photographer, Michael Coyne (who was the lead photographer at publications such as the National Geographic, Newsweek and Time Magazine). Here’s a short podcast about Emma’s inspiration behind her series and why she chose to design her exhibition space in a house that was up for demolition:

 

Here’s what setting up the exhibition looked like (click to play):

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Within the first few hours of her exhibition opening, Broadsheet Melbourne (a leading online magazine that covers the latest news about Melbourne culture) wrote a story about her incredible exhibition concept:

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Not surprisingly, Emma was then interviewed by Stephanie Ferrier from ABC News! Here is the entire story:

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The PSC community support has been unconditional. I’ve never once felt like I need to conform to any particular style or genre, i’ve been free to express my creativity however I please & that encouragement has been invaluable in helping me get to where I am now. After the overwhelming response from this exhibition I might look at exhibiting it elsewhere in Australia and no doubt i’ll be off on another overseas trip soon to create a new body of work, possibly in rural China.
– Emma McEvoy

We are really proud of Emma’s awesome work and look forward to sharing more updates about her progress!

PSC Grad Nathan Larkin Presents ‘Cede’ at Testing Grounds

Nathan Larkin (PSC Graduate)
‘Cede’ Exhibition Opening
23rd March, 5-7pm 
Testing Grounds (1 – 23 City Road, Southbank VIC 3006) 

Image By Nathan Larkin

Image By Nathan Larkin

Nathan Larkin, PSC graduate of the Bachelor Programme (majoring in photojournalism) is exhibiting ‘Cede‘, after completing his studies. Nathan currently runs his own photography studio ‘PhyNyght’ – a collective for photographers and photojournalists and is extremely active in the Melbourne photography scene.

“Cede as a word lives in a duality of good and bad. My work is based on my time hiking around the Yarra River, from the mouth located at the Westgate to Warrandyte, where the fast water from the mountains meet the diversions and slack water of the tidal estuary. This work is an exploration of Colonial, Post Colonial, and Indigenous history along its banks and the psychogeography of the waterway.”

Image by Nathan Larkin

Image by Nathan Larkin

Reflecting on his time as a photography student, Nathan feels proud about having his exhibition in close proximity to the PSC campus, where so many friends and teachers influenced him in his work.

“My time at PSC was amazing and I learned to craft an idea and see where the potential lies in photographic storytelling. The staff and fellow students really helped me to understand and see my visual style, as well as the ways I could explore it more. PSC is full of very inspiring people and I am always amazed at the depth of feedback given. Katrin Koenning and Michael Coyne really pushed me to understand my visual language and how I wanted to tell my story.”

We’re are excited about having the chance to see Nathan’s most recent displayed. The exhibition definitely promises to be an experience where viewers will get to ask deeper questions about the history and memories connected to places around us, in Melbourne.

 

PSC’s Women Photographers at Queen Victoria Women’s Centre

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The Queen Victoria Women’s Centre is a haven of organisations and groups dedicated to empowering and helping women in all walks of life. From arranging emotional support to getting political and professional networks in place for supporting causes, the centre has worked on all fronts to build a stronger community of women in Melbourne. Having graduates and students exhibit their work in such an important centre is therefore a great achievement. Selected by Julie Wajs, each series reflects some aspect of womanhood, spanning over generations.

PSC teacher/curator Julie Wajs with PSC students Margaret Lim and Cassandra Tzortzoglou

PSC teacher/curator Julie Wajs with PSC students Margaret Lim and Cassandra Tzortzoglou

Patricia Saca, the venues coordinator for the centre was pleased to see the public’s reception of work that went up last week. According to her, the strength of the exhibition lies in the variety of styles in photographs that are already drawing widespread appreciation from those who pass through the corridors. Encouraging an open-policy approach to circulating fresh artwork by emerging artists, Patricia never places restrictions on the nature of work, often refusing to take down images even when the most seldom of complaints are expressed. She is proud to promote and support such spectacular talent from PSC.

QVWC venues coordinator, Patricia Saca and Margaret Lim

QVWC venues coordinator, Patricia Saca and Margaret Lim

Margaret Lim:

Margaret Lim with her Family

Margaret Lim with her Family

Margret Lim has one of the largest installations at the exhibition. Using materials and objects from Op-Shops around Melbourne, she created a series that signifies the dynamic nature of women. According to her, women reinvent themselves continuously throughout their lives and build upon their understanding and wisdom of the world and themselves, with time.

 Cassandra Tzortzoglou:

Cassandra Tzortzolgou with her work

Cassandra Tzortzolgou with her work

Cassandra Tzortzolgou on the other hand, takes us on a path that is mysterious and focused on elements of nature. Inspired by Greek mythology and tales revolving around bees and the symbolism of honey for her series Natural Phenomena, Cassandra exhibits the second part of the series with the ‘complex relationship between man and nature’.

 Elma Gradascevic:

 Elma Gradascevic with her work

Elma Gradascevic with her work

Elma Gradascevic constructed a project based on how technology can overpower or diminish the innate nature of women. She believes that ‘our natural world is largely disappearing from our daily lives, but its symbolism in cultural motifs demonstrate how integral it is to our internal and creative selves.’ She uses feathers to represent hope.

Elena D San Roman:

By Elena D San Roman

By Elena D San Roman

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by Elena D San Roman

 

Elena D San Roman based her series ”Point of Entry’ on ‘the experience of remembering’. From her artist’s statement she expresses: ‘I’m exploring the process of recall, accessing a memory and the transformation that comes from reliving an experience of childhood trauma.No matter how much time passes, the fear and anxiety that comes from trauma is always present, it hides in the shadows, haunting you every day. Ugly images flash before your eyes when you least expect it, making you question what is real and what is not.’

Allison Rose:

by Allison Rose

by Allison Rose

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By Allison Rose

Allison Rose creates a vibrant series that ‘explores the contradictions of a readymade life from conception to birth – futuristic, convenient, mass-produced and fast.’ Each piece of artwork conveys a message about how the basic human need to create is now so ‘automated’ and often described in a language that mirrors the process of manufacturing.  Objects used in her work represent ‘a part of the cycle of creation’ and have been captured by x-ray machines.

Emma McEvoy:

Copyrighted, Emma McEvoy

Copyrighted, Emma McEvoy

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Copyrighted, Emma McEvoy

From a section of Emma McEvoy’ artist statement, we can definitely note how she deals with metaphor in her photography language: ‘(This is) a series which embraces the hues of authenticity via femininity and nakedness, and the water’s symbolic ebb and flow, through the thought-provoking palette of photography. Each photograph attempts to surface the fear of fragility. Bare skin emerging from a body of water – canvasing a reflection of Mother Nature, and sculpting a refuge for surrender: a place where vulnerability enfolds.’

Sophie Pigram:

Photograph of Sophie Pigram taken by Cassandra Tzortzolgou

Photograph of Sophie Pigram taken by Cassandra Tzortzolgou

Aesthetically driven and inspired by the physical molecular basis of memory itself captured by The Albert Einstein College of Medicine in early 2014, Blank Spaces is an exploration into the abstract realm of memory. Through self portraiture and object the work creates a physical representation of  the physiological workings of the mind, focusing on retained and recollective thought that have been confabulated over time and its effect on the subconscious. [From Sophie Pigram’s website].

Claire Blankendaal:

Images by Claire Blankendaal

Images by Claire Blankendaal

‘The Autonomous is a series of photographs born from a conceptual idea of self and what it means to be a female artist in Australia engaging with feminist issues in 2015. Approaching my camera like I would a diary and allocating time and space to each entry, I use methods of automatism, ritual, endurance and the performative body. In these I have found my position in the discussion—freedom of choice, celebration of differences and above all personal autonomy, these are the scaffold that structure my outlook and actions. By stripping back pre-conceived notions of femininity and being conscious in my influences and environment I have found freedom. In the act of creation and immersing myself in my practice, in these moments I am completely autonomous.’

Sarah Maslan:

Sarah Maslan with her work and Elma Gradascevic

Sarah Maslan with her work and Elma Gradascevic

‘The idea that people from different parts of the world, with completely different cultures, religions and life experiences can share the same dream is fascinating. In fact, some psychologists believe that our shared dream experiences serve to connect us as a human race. We can find meaning in everything. Even the everyday shapes and symbols that repeat in nature, and our world around us, can convey a message. When we dream, the conscious reality of today disappears and all that existed beyond the bounds is brought forward so time seems to be just a notion that slowly fades, leaving the past and the present intertwined. Herein resides our true awareness.’

 

PSC is proud of these students who come from a range of the course we provide (Bachelor of Photography, Advanced Diploma and Part Time cohorts). It is wonderful to see such talents come together and their work to reflect something so meaningful.

We will be updating this page soon with statements from other artists of PSC who are exhibiting. It would be great for you to come by and see the exhibition during March. If you’d like to exhibit your work at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre, feel free to contact them.

Conceptualising a Women’s Day Exhibition with Julie Wajs

Teacher and head curator at PSC, Julie Wajs takes a fresh approach to curating an exhibition for one of the most important days of the year. For our ‘Women in Photography’ focus this month, she gives us an insight into the care taken to organise ‘Our Stories… Our Vision…’ . This is a celebration of International Women’s Day with works selected by PSC’s talented pool of female photographers. These are currently being exhibited at the Queen Victoria Women’s centre.

Here are Julie’s thoughts about the event and her approach to curating the exhibition:

For International Women’s Day our exhibition at the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre had to be a selection of work by our female students across different majors of the college. It’s always good to have a bit of a mix in the scheme of things stylistically, especially in such a public space that has a historical aspect to it. We were very conscious of the fact that the centre supports women in all areas of life; both politically and emotionally, and the work chosen for this had to be reflective of that. There’s always a sense of responsibility when putting any exhibition together – you definitely have to be sensitive to the space you’re in.

By Elena D San Roman

By Elena D San Roman

Selecting some of the bigger pieces of work by students and graduates, the subject matter in each series deals with personal, political and fashion-related issues in some way, mirroring the perspective of women.

Margaret Lim

By Margaret Lim

What makes this exhibition interesting is the fact that it ranges across students who study full time and part time at PSC, which means that we are looking at work produced by a cross section of different generations. It’s a great way to see how a wide age group approaches certain topics differently, or sometimes in very similar ways.

By Emma McEvoy

By Emma McEvoy

I hope those who come to the exhibition are provoked into engaging with the work and having an opinion about them. It’s important for us to get people to think about some of the aspects that these photographs are touching upon.

To be a part of the exhibition, visit the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre on 210 Lonsdale Street, on 9th March at 6pm.  You can hear more about Julie’s process of curating here

Antonia Hempel Inspires Artists at St. Kilda Town Hall

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Antonia Hempel graduated with a Bachelor of Photography at PSC in June 2015. Barely a year later, she has been given the opportunity to have her work showcased at the very prestigious exhibition space for national artists; The Gallery (St. Kilda Town Hall).
Antonia Hempel spent three years hiking and kayaking her way to remote bodies of water, in Australia and overseas, for her exhibition “Renewal”. The series was developed while Antonia was at PSC, allowing her to receive guidance from her tutors who helped finesse her vision with this particular piece of work . The stunning video and photographic images she captured of these little- visited locations are accompanied by the recorded sounds of running water and pristine tones of a crystal Tibetan singing bowl.
Antonia on location

Antonia Hempel

Antonia uses water as a symbol of the connectivity of all living things as well as a tool for exploring a meditative calming response.
“Water is the connector of life, the common denominator that weaves all living things together. As it is a powerful symbol of connectivity, water is a perfect tool for exploring a meditative, calming response. My inspiration comes directly from nature and my love for the land. I hope my work will encourage people to celebrate and bond with nature and feel peaceful, even if just for a short time.”
– Antonia Hempel

Antonia worked closely with sound healer Ami Hasson, who used a singing bowl and Native American medicine drum to produce the distinctive soundtrack. Her husband, Gaston Freddi, accompanied her on location to record the sound of water and contributed original compositions to the soundtrack.

‘Renewal’ can be viewed at The Gallery, St Kilda Town Hall, from 6 January – 3 February, with an official opening at 6pm on Thursday, 14 January.

Antonia on location_2

Antonia Hempel on Location while shooting ‘Renewal’.

 

Antonia lives and works as a practicing photographer in Melbourne, she works in a variety of other mediums including video and painting. Her works are a response to capturing the beauty of the natural environment. Shooting entirely in remote and sometimes inaccessible locations that are largely untouched by human intervention. She shot Renewal over a period of three years filming and photographing bodies of water around Australia and Overseas. All of her photographs were printed by Peter Hatzipavlis at ThePrintShop @ PSC.

Highlights from the Thirty One exhibition

The Thirty One Exhibition opening night on Thursday 17 December at the OKLA Gallery was the highlight of the year for the graduating Bachelor students. A wonderful evening was had by all, filled with good cheer and celebration.

After much dedication and hard work throughout the year, it is so rewarding to finally see their finished images on display. The diversity of work was a testament to the focus of the students in exploring their own creative paths as they focussed on their chosen specialisations – Photojournalism, Art and Commercial photography.

Emily Tucci

Emily Tucci with her work

Emily Tucci, one of the exhibiting students, agreed saying “It’s been a really good experience being able to collaborate as an entire group on this project. Usually group exhibitions are much smaller so having 30 photographers involved has been really different and a lot of fun to have everyone all together mixing the specialisations.”

We also had the opportunity to chat to Jordan Madge and Piers Fitton about their work and experiences this year.

Jordan Madge

Jordan Madge with his work

“It’s amazing to be finished the Bachelor course and to have been part of this exhibition. For me it wasn’t just about photography in terms of learning, there were a lot of other different steps along the way.  There’s personal growth and friendships and its the way you think as well because its not necessarily just taking photos, its the way you look at everything in life now.” – Jordan Madge

Piers Fitton

Piers Fitton with his work

Piers Fitton – “This year I did something that I really wanted to do, it wasn’t just part of an assignment, it was my own path to explore and build my creative ideas further.  I’m really happy because I have accomplished what I set out do.”

 

Laura Scholfield

Laura Scholfield with her work

“Studying at PSC has been the best 3 years of my life and the friendships I’ve made are friends for life.  The last three weeks without PSC have actually been so boring and I miss it so much every day … but it is an amazing feeling to be finished and i’m really excited about what the future holds.” – Laura Scholfield

If you missed the exhibition at OKLA Gallery @The Compound Interest then you can still see the work on show here at the PSC End of Year Exhibition and pick up a copy of the exhibition catalogue.  The exhibition is open Monday to Friday 9am – 5pm from 4 January at PSC, 65 City Road, Southbank.

PSC Staff

PSC staff (Left to Right): Carmen Edwards, Communications & Students; Daniel Boetker-Smith, Bachelor Course Director; Jim Davidson, Chair PSC Governing Council; Katrin Koenning, Photojournalism Major teacher; Julie Moss, Managing Director; Melina Rookes, Communications & Students

Congratulations to all of the students involved and also to the staff and teachers that have supported them on their journey.

Raquel

Raquel Betiz with her work

 

 

 

Louisa Bufardeci’s Series Purchased by NGV

Congratulations to Louisa Bufardeci, one of our very talented teachers at PSC for not only holding a solo exhibition last month, but having her entire series purchased by the National Gallery of Victoria.


Louisa for PSC

Louisa’s series ‘The Sea Between A and I’, is an ongoing project, from which eight ‘needlepoints’ were exhibited at the Anna Schwartz Gallery. The needlepoints reflect the space between Indonesia and mark the coordinates of eight tragedies that have occurred on the Indian ocean. Louisa incorporated new technology from Google Earth to base her image on. The series touches upon a very topical issue related to the journey of people who travel across the ocean to Australia, often falling victim to maritime disasters:

“This work reflects on the asylum seekers lost in the sea between Australia and Indonesia.  I found the media reports on the issue had become increasingly abstract — less information about the number of people drowned, less information about where they were from, less information about whether they were men or women, young or old, and less information about why they were risking the journey.”

Artwork by Louisa Bufardeci

Artwork by Louisa Bufardeci

The project covers a mix of different media; photographs, video, drawings and the use of fibreglass screens with needlepoints on them. Materials used are subject to interpretation.

Artwork by Louisa Bufardeci

Artwork by Louisa Bufardeci

Artwork by Louisa Bufardeci

Artwork by Louisa Bufardeci

“I am very happy for the work.  It gives me great pleasure to know that art reflecting this serious topic is deemed valuable by our main cultural institution.” – Louisa Bufardeci

We are so glad that our teachers play such prominent roles in the arts industry. Our students get the best exposure and real-world experience as a result of learning from talented, practicing professionals.