Feature Friday October 13th, 2017; Sally Kaack

“ ‘Hear the dance, see the music’  is a quote spoken by the legendary choreographer George Balanchine, to describe the relationship between dance and music. In six words, he has articulated how dance visually expresses music, and what dancers should bear in mind when they perform. For many, dance is music made visible.”

This quote is by second year Bachelor of Photography student Sally Kaack as she introduces her folio ‘Revelations’; which explores the natural communicative abilities associated with dancing.

 

 

Sally Kaack, ‘Revelations’, 2017

 

 

Why did you choose to do photography?
I chose photography because of it’s natural ability to preserve a moment in time. I’ve always had an interest in art and it’s story telling capabilities. Therefore, using photographs to portray thoughts and ideas, as well as recovering the thoughts and ideas of historical artist was a great interest of mine.

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m currently working on a photobook titled ‘We Came As Children’ which photographically explores the relationship between the notions of home and memory – using the nature and benefits of photography as a medium to document and preserve. The project includes archival images that my grandfather took, along with my own images. The series touches on the ‘saudade’ a Portuguese word, meaning ‘the love that remains’.

 

Sally Kaack, ‘We Came As Children’, 2017

Have you done a body of work that you have found challenging?
I think every body of work is just as challenging. As you grow as an artist, you want to explore new concepts, and find new ways to portray them. This also comes with a higher expectation of one’s self but it’s always a fun challenge, especially when it all comes together at the end – even if not how you envisioned!

Is there a series of work you have done that you are particularly proud of?
I just took part in a small group exhibition, where one of my series called ‘Faded’ was exhibited. This was my first folio that I created last year. It was exciting and nice to share the area with fellow students. With each body of work, I constantly think of something I could have done differently so it’s always a constant strive.

What is your dream job/shoot? Future ambition?
I’d love to be an art lecturer one day. Something I’ve learnt at PSC is how important it is to share concepts and build from one another. I think it’d be extremely rewarding, helping others develop and flourish. PSC has been an exceptional environment in this regard. In the mean time, I enjoy working with dancers and I’d love to collaborate with some of my favourites – one day!

 

To see more of Sally’s work follow her on Instagram, or check out her website.

 

 

Sally Kaack, ‘The Hanger’, 2017

Malaysia Monday; Monica Wilmott

Wanderlust, that deep desire to travel to a place far away, is a familiar feeling in so many of us. What if you had the opportunity to travel overseas and do a workshop with renowned photographers, then sit down and have a drink and chat with them afterwards, all the while improving your photography? Of course you would go! That’s exactly what some of our second year Bachelor of Photography students did. We recently caught up with Monica Wilmott who went to Malaysia’s premiere photography festival; Obscura.

 

Monica Willmot, 2017

 

What did you learn about photography?
When I was in Malaysia I learned that photojournalism is something that I wish to explore more in my work. I had some interest in PJ before the trip, but after being there and meeting with (Leonard) Pongo, it is definitely something I want to try out more in the future.

What was your favourite moment?
I had lots of great moments but my favourite would have been seeing my work at the screening, it was really short but I just had this great feeling of pride.

Who was your workshop teacher?
Leonard Pongo, he was great at giving feedback and I feel like I clicked with him a lot.

Did it change your perception on anything?
Being over there made me realise how big the photography scene is in other countries, especially in Asia. Photography is more main stream and in a way more accepted and celebrated over there which I found really cool.

What was your work about?
My original plan before I went to Malaysia was to do a documentary series about a turtle sanctuary in Penang National Park. However Leonard gave me the challenge “Can you make it look post-apocalyptic, like turtles took over the world” which was something I really ran with in my series.

Monica Willmott, 2017

What were some of the challenges you faced?
The main challenge I think I faced was just time and navigating my way around an unfamiliar city. I also found it challenging to just focus on photography for an entire 2 weeks, but also being surrounded by like-minded people 24/7 was something I found really exciting; it was really good to have them around to bounce ideas off at all hours of the day.

 

Now back in Melbourne, in your second half of second year (over half way through the degree), what are you working on? 
For this folio I am currently working on a photojournalistic series focusing on abandoned farm houses in northern Victoria. I came to this idea because I live in an area that is constantly expanding, I often see farm houses that are full of history, being knocked down and replaced with new estates. My aim with this project is to show people how lovely some of these old houses are and in a way presvere them before they are gone. To find some of the houses I had to do some digging, I focused most of my research on looking at local reports, newspapers, some tourist information brochures and heritage listings for diffrent councils.

 

Monica Willmott, ‘Historic’ (working title), 2017

 

To see more of Monica’s work, follow her on Instagram.

Friday Feature 6th October 2017; Shelby Eade

Today we are featuring second year Bachelor of Photography student Shelby Eade and her experience at the Obscura Festival of Photography earlier this year.

 

Shelby Eade, “Pink”, 2017

How was your experience at Obscura? What did you learn about yourself or your photography?
It was good but it was intense, my workshop teacher was Wawi Navarroza. I learned a lot about my work flow, and my work ethic as a photographer, as well as how much work goes into every little thing. I also learned how to develop an idea and push it in a short space of time which was helpful to see what kind of drive you have to have.

What was your favourite moment?
My favourite thing was the end of the workshops, at the projection screening of what everybody did and created in those five days. We all came together like one big family.

Did it change your perception of photography?
It changed how I approach photography as a medium, I think more about my concept and how to approach the images themselves. Not just snap shots but thinking and planning for each image.

 

Shelby Eade, “Pink”, 2017

What was your body of work about?
My work was about the colour pink and my relationship with the colour itself. I looked at the colour and the architecture of the place I was in, finding the similarities between the buildings and my body-the familiar colours and shapes. At the age of six I begged for a Barbie pink room, everything had to be pink. As I grew older the stereotypical association with the colour pink of being weak and sensitive, caused me to dislike it.

Arriving in Penang the bold use of pink covering the buildings is what re-sparked my interest in the colour. The unfamiliar clash of strong shapes used with bold colours, are not common aspects within suburban Melbourne. Discussing ideas and bouncing things off of Wawi helped me push and develop my idea into what it became.

The main challenge I faced was the limitations of such a specific concept. I struggled trying to get it past just the colour, then when it came down to buildings and bodies, I struggled to make my body in the shape of the architecture.

 

Shelby Eade, “Maribyrnong/Mareingalk”, 2017

What are you working on right now?
My second semester folio. It’s about the Maribyrnong River, memory and home; I grew up near the Campaspe River and used to camp with my family along the Murray. Since moving to Melbourne, I’ve become homesick so I’m using the river as a reflection on my memories and my home.

This folio is a work-in-progress, how has it developed? How have you developed?
I’ve done a fair bit of research on the river and some pretty interesting things have happened. There used to be a meat packing business, and tea gardens; there is now a detention centre which you can see but can’t get to. I now also have more respect for the Indigenous history.

 

See more of Shelby’s work on her website.

Masters of Arts – Photography tutor; Kristian Häggblom

As the excitement for our new Masters of Arts – Photography program continues to gain momentum, we decided to learn more about the tutors who will be involved. Kristian Häggblom started working at PSC earlier this year, but has already made a lasting impression on the Bachelor of Photography students he works with.

Kristian Haggblom, ‘Queenstown’, 1998

 

How did your postgraduate studies further your photographic thinking?
Doing a PhD enabled me to concentrate on a long-term photographic project and ensure it was completed to the highest standard. Importantly, it taught me to think more critically about my own work and also write about it with much more clarity.

What advice do you have for undergraduate students?
As an undergraduate student I think you need to saturate yourself in photography and the themes you are researching – read, read, read. I also highly encourage students to experiment, learn the basics, but also break the rules.

Can you tell us about what you are presently working on?
I’m researching a bearded seal that lived in the Tama River in Tokyo for a time during 2002 and then disappeared.

What was the last exhibition or publication or curatorial project you worked on?
Earlier this year I collaborated with an Indian friend and photographer, Farhad Bomanjee, to curate an exhibition of my photographs made in Japan between 2000 – 2008. It was at his gallery in the Kala Ghoda Café in Mumbai and part of the extensive FOCUS Photography Festival.

What do you enjoy about working with graduate students?
Working with graduate students is inspiring as they are very passionate and often I learn from their in-depth research. It is also great witnessing breakthroughs in student projects, when the dot-to-dot process aligns and results become clear.

What’s the best thing about the environment at PSC?
The staff at PSC are all active in varying forms of photography and it is exciting to work in such an engaged an immersive environment.

 

 

Take a look at Kristian’s work on his website.