PSC pals – A new student mentor program for 2017 – Featuring Sally Kaack

Starting in 2017, we have a new student peer-to-peer mentoring program called PSC pals. The program gives current second and third year students the ability to mentor and support students who are new to PSC.

Throughout the year in 2017, we will be bringing you updates from the PSC pals program, but until then we will be featuring one of the PSC pals student mentors here on our blog and on our social media channels per week until the start of semester one.

For our sixth week, we’re glad to feature Sally Kaack (second year 2017).

by Sally Kaack

Apply now to study at PSC in 2017!

PSC is still accepting applications for study in 2017! We offer a range of courses from the full time Bachelor Degree, to the part time Advanced Diploma, to a range of Pro Certificate and Online Courses.

While the main round VTAC offers have already gone out for the Bachelor Degree, we are still accepting direct applications for the February 2017 intake. We’re also accepting direct applications for the part time Advanced Diploma course, the Pro Certificate courses and our Online Courses, all of which have multiple intake dates throughout the year.

Please feel free to contact us on (03) 9682 3191 or via our website to arrange a tour or make an enquiry.

PSC Teacher Julie Wajs – Exhibition & book launch next week!

You’re invited to join us in celebrating the World Of Difference exhibition and book launch at Media House Gallery, The Age Building (655 Collins Street) next Thursday evening (2nd of February) from 6pm – 8:30pm.

In January 2016, PSC teacher Julie Wajs travelled to Cambodia with World Of Difference, a charity established by Bronwyn Stephens who is a member of the Rotary Club of South Melbourne. The charity takes tours to Cambodia to introduce people to some of the many development projects that Rotary has helped facilitate there. Julie saw first hand the results of the work that World of Difference has done with villagers living in rural Cambodia. On her return to Australia she decided to put a book together for World of Difference to sell, to help raise funds to continue the work they are doing in Cambodia. Michael Short is The Age‘s chief editorial writer, as well as a columnist and opinion editor for The Sunday Age. In 2010, he created The Zone, an ideas and advocacy forum in The Age and across Fairfax Media’s online platforms. He is a board member and ambassador of a number of organisations, and is a frequent public speaker and moderator. Michael also did a trip to Cambodia and wrote several articles about the work that Bronwyn has done. His words have helped give context to Julie’s images.

We would love to see you there to support the fantastic people who have been working hard to support this great cause!

by Julie Wajs

We also spoke with Julie last week to hear about her experiences in Cambodia and she told us about the efforts to make a lot of the communities in Cambodia self sufficient by helping provide access to clean water, building a school and training teachers to help with the lack of education in the communities.

Julie travelled with a group of doctors, who were able to provide medical checks to people in need while she was able to take photographs and document the entire trip.

by Julie Wajs

In addition to the book, Julie has also put together an exhibition, with sponsorship from Ilford Paper and the PrintShop@PSC. The book and exhibition prints will be sold on the night, with all proceeds going to straight back to World Of Difference to continue training teachers and providing resources directly to those in need.

At PSC, Julie teaches the commercial major in both the bachelor degree and advanced diploma courses and has also been responsible for putting together our massive mid year and end of year exhibitions which is a huge job in and of itself!

 

PSC Graduate Jordan Madge Exhibition at CCP opening Friday night

One of our talented graduates, Jordan Madge, is opening his Elysian Fields exhibition at CCP on Friday night. The exhibition runs through until the 12th of March. We wish Jordan a fantastic opening night and we hope to see you there!

Elysian Fields is a portrait of the community of Rutherglen, a small town in North-Eastern Victoria, Australia. The work derives from two found photographs and reflects Jordan Madge’s interest in appropriation and the found image, and its capacity to contextualise contemporary social and physical Australian landscapes.

by Jordan Madge

We also took this opportunity to speak to Jordan about his time at PSC and his exhibition.

Why did you decide to study at PSC?
I was drawn towards PSC because of how photographically driven it is as an institution. The appeal in that for me was a sense of immersion in photography.

How did PSC help get you where you are today?
The network that was built and nurtured during my time at PSC was probably one of the most, if not the most, important aspects of where I am in regards to achieving personal goals.

by Jordan Madge

Tell us about your new exhibition.
Elysian Fields is the title of the work that I’ll be showing at The Centre for Contemporary Photography in Fitzroy from late January until the middle of march. The work was derived from two found photographs dating back to 1949 and 1950 that depict the entire town of Rutherglen. The use of appropriation has been an element of previous projects. I’m curious to see what meaning is received from re-contextualising and manipulating pre-existing material. Being able to show the work in a gallery context where I have full control of lighting, size and material gives me the opportunity to alter the original meaning on another platform.    

by Jordan Madge

Who and/or what inspires you?
What inspires me is continually changing, one day it might be an article I’ve read on a website I’ve never seen and the next it may be a manipulated face on a worn down poster.

What has been the most rewarding part of your career so far?
One of the most rewarding parts of my career would have been going to Japan to hold a solo exhibition and residency. Being accepted for the residency Japan, in my mind, showed me that I can physically take photography anywhere in the world and that there are opportunities everywhere, at home and abroad.

Elysian Fields is proudly supported by the Photography Studies College Print Shop.

by Jordan Madge

Graduate Feature – Michael Foxington

We’ve recently been in touch with a bunch of our graduates and asked them to share a bit about their experience at PSC and to let us know what they’ve been up to since graduating.

Today, we’re really excited to feature Michael Foxington, who finished studying at PSC in 2016.

What got you started in photography?
I have always been creative, I’ve tried my hand at many different things, illustration, sketching, painting, digital painting, music. I’ve always had a deep urge to create. Through most of my life i was creating just for myself as a form of self expression. Eventually I hit a point where I needed to start producing higher quality references for my paintings. So I thought I would get a digital camera and it would be so easy to capture the images as I envisioned them. I was so delightfully wrong. I picked up my camera and barely put it down over the next five years. My first two years in photography I got a lot of photos of my dog, friends and places that I would frequent. I read everything I could about technique and technology and went about as far as I could on my own.

Why did you decide to study at PSC?
One day I realised that I was no longer following any of my other creative pursuits. I had set up a small home studio and was shooting portraits every day if I wasn’t working on my photography, then I was reading about photography. I realised that this had become my passion and I was very aware of something being missing. I researched courses and institutions around Melbourne. I researched the people who had come from the institutions and their achievements, I read reviews and I went to open days. I decided to study at PSC because although I actually missed the open day, they were happy to take me on a tour of the building and talk about the course. I walked in and saw the beautiful photographs on the wall and fell in love. This is what was missing from my work, the context, the concept, the style and the power of the images I was seeing. I knew that I wanted to make images that could inspire others the way these images inspired me.

by Michael Foxington

How did PSC help get you where you are today?
PSC opened my eyes to artists who I might have never discovered on my own. Through the bachelor degree I learned about the history of photography, I learned about reading meaning into images and the tools to tell stories through images. Through the course of study, my thought process behind creating changed completely and I feel matured through the development of work and the encouragement, feedback and critique received from the lecturers and fellow students. I also received many opportunities to expand my network and meet people through recommendations who also influenced my photography. Whether through our trip to Malaysia for the Obscura Festival, or through the Image Makers seminars, or the opportunities to assist photographers.

How do you balance your commercial and personal work?
I pursue commercial work to finance my personal work. There are many rewarding things to be gained from commercial work. When you are working within a commercial budget you learn how to be efficient and productive. When I am producing my personal work I apply the same working methods to ensure that the project is executed and realised. Although in personal work there is sometimes more freedom to experiment and more freedom to sometimes get it wrong and go back to the drawing board. Although many of my personal projects are collaborations with other creatives, so we generally try to plan and pre-produce together efficiently to ensure that we get the results we want.

by Michael Foxington

Tell us a bit about your new job as well as your personal work.
Just after graduating I received an offer for full time employment as a studio product photographer for a large homewares company. I actually saw the job crop up on the PSC job register and thought to myself it would be a great opportunity and I considered it very thoroughly before I wrote in an application. The strength of my portfolio managed to secure me a trial and my experiences in studio photography that I had developed at PSC helped me to do well at my trial. 

I’m very excited to start on this job and challenge myself every day to produce amazing images for this company. So I will be fairly busy working for them during the week and I’ll be spending my weekends working on my personal work. 

What are you working on at the moment?
I have a few projects for this year that I’ve already begun, I’ll be exploring further into still life art photography, and combining fashion, beauty and art to make some interesting commentary on relationships. I’ve also got some amazing collaborations lined up, there are a few that are in pre-production phase at the moment, so meetings, discussions and a lot of sketches. I don’t want to get too far into detail on some of these as some of them are seeds that need a lot of soil, water and sunlight to mature into fully formed images. 

by Michael Foxington

Who and/or what inspires you?
I’m drawing inspiration from many places, it really depends on the project to where the inspiration is coming from. Some ideas are inspired by music, and some are inspired by memories. Right now, I’m going back through David Cronenberg’s filmography and realising some interesting things about the way he tells a story. I’m also looking at Yoko Honda, Roxi-Lola McCormick Thompson and Leta Sobierajski.

What has been the most rewarding part of your career so far?
I would say assisting Lindsay Adler when she ran her Masterclass. It was amazing to handle the equipment for someone who is such a legendary photographer, I learned so much on set and it was an amazing opportunity for me. It was one of the coolest opportunities that arose for me at PSC.

What advice would you give to current PSC students or people thinking of enrolling at PSC?
For current PSC students, make every moment count. Don’t miss the opportunity to speak to teachers you don’t have classes with, I’ve learned so much from teachers I did not have classes with. Remember that in order to find your voice you have to speak, so pick up your camera as much as you can and show new work every week in class, by the end of the course you’ll be amazed at what you have achieved. Also you won’t learn everything in class, take the initiative to read more, shoot more, do things because it is what you want to do, not because you think it will get you a better mark. For people thinking about enrolling at PSC, book in a time to talk to someone, go and look at the work on the walls and look up the graduates and alumni to see what they’ve achieved.

You can see more of Michael’s work on his Instagram and website.

Our full time Bachelor degree and part time Advanced Diploma courses for 2017 are still open for application, so if you’re interested in following Chloe’s footsteps, give us a call on (03) 9682 3191 or visit our website.

PSC graduate Jade Byrnes published in the New York Times

Jade Byrnes, one of our 2016 bachelor degree graduates (photojournalism major), has been published in the New York Times in two travel feature articles on Melbourne and Victoria!

The New York Times originally contacted Katrin Koenning, our bachelor degree photojournalism teacher, who has a huge international profile and is regularly working for clients and agencies around the world. Katrin offered the job to Jade, who impressed the editors at the New York Times and had her work published across two separate articles. This is just another example of how PSC’s worldwide industry connections benefit our students and graduates!

You can read the articles and see Jade’s photographs at the New York Times website here and here.

 

Congratulations to our new first year students for 2017!

Congratulations to everyone who received a main round offer from PSC today! You will be receiving information packs in the mail shortly and we look forward to seeing you for enrolment next week and for our first year orientation day on the 16th of February.

If you’d still like to apply for 2017, it’s not too late! We’re still accepting direct applications, so give us a call on (03) 9682 3191 or visit our website to arrange a tour or to make an application.

 

Graduate Feature – Chloe Smith

As a fun way to start the year, we’ve been in touch with a bunch of our graduates and asked them to share a bit about their experience at PSC and to let us know what they’ve been up to since graduating.

Today, we’re really excited to feature Chloe Smith, who finished studying at PSC in 2015 and is a photographer for The Weekly Times newspaper while she also continues to build her own business.

Chloe Smith / Behind the scenes working for The Weekly Times / Photo credit: Gippsland Jersey

What got you started in photography?
I always had a camera growing up, but I was always more into drawing and painting. I was always taking photos of my pets and friends, but often used those photos as a reference for a drawing. My school didn’t offer photography, so it wasn’t really something I thought about. It was only once year 12 came around that I realised how much I was going to miss my friends and how scared I was of losing precious memories, so I just started documenting everything with my camera that I got for my 17th birthday/Christmas. I had no idea about the technical aspect of photography, but it wasn’t needed to capture a true smile or a fun moment that wasn’t to happen again. That’s really where it took off. I realised from there how much I loved capturing emotion and bubbly moments full of laughter and happiness. To me, photography was and still is about capturing those magic little moments that are often missed or overlooked. 

by Chloe Smith

Why did you decide to study at PSC?
PSC wasn’t where I thought I would be going. In fact, I had no idea what I wanted to do. Unsure about photography, I took a gap year after being accepted into PSC. The gap year wasn’t great, and I decided I didn’t want to have a year like that again, so I bit the bullet (still unsure about doing photography) and went to PSC. And now here we are – you could say it turned out to be something I would really enjoy!

by Chloe Smith

When did you graduate and what did you focus on?
I graduated with my bachelor degree in 2015 with a major in commercial photography. At the time, my folio chopped and changed so much! First semester I focused more on lifestyle photography, something I’ve always loved, and second semester I went back to what I was pretty familiar with growing up in a country town which was more of a rural/dogs portfolio. 

by Chloe Smith

How did PSC help get you where you are today?
At first, I struggled with forming concepts, but that struggle really helped in the long run. I worked my butt off every week to always be shooting new images. It was my way of dealing with the struggle of concepts. That way I could be shown through my work how to stitch it all together with images I was already producing. I am very thankful for my teachers that would go through all of my images each week to help me out, and also the massive amount I usually had at the end of semester. It also helped that I was encouraged to make more work as often as possible, so that drive to create and work hard to do so has really been drilled into me and helps me a lot today to keep pushing on and creating no matter how busy I am! PSC also got me out of my comfort zone (a lot) but it’s all been for the better! I can now strike up a conversation with anyone I want (I was really shy), which really helps when working for a newspaper! 

by Chloe Smith

How do you balance your job and personal work?
I work a few different jobs, so fitting in personal work is hard, but at the same time, I enjoy my other jobs a lot too! Plus, sometimes shooting jobs you can put your own little spin on them so it’s not like your totally missing out on creating for yourself. If I really want to make work that is my own however, I just make time somewhere and go for it. I love capturing any little magic moment, and they happen every day. So most days I’ll just carry my camera around and I’m sure to capture something for my soul. 

by Chloe Smith

Tell us a bit about your job with The Weekly Times and your own personal practice/business.
The work I do for The Weekly Times and my own work is very different, but I love both just as much! Probably the only similar thing is that every day I’m outdoors. The Weekly Times is a rural newspaper, so every day I’m out driving hundreds of kilometres to capture photos. I travel all over Victoria, often driving between 4-8 (sometimes more) hours a day, depending on where the job is in Victoria. I get to meet all kinds of people, mostly farmers, and go to all types of farms and events. The things I photograph range from farmers to cattle and sheep, fruit and vegetables, harvest, machines, even rural artists and sunrises over vines. It’s a lot of fun and every day I’m learning so much. I’m constantly challenged by weather and light and by being pushed out of my comfort zone. 

My own commercial business focuses more on lifestyle, a bit of underwater and fashion photography, and a little less of the rural life. Instead, I’m usually hitting up the beach! I love to shoot fashion and swimwear, but in a fun and more candid/lifestyle way. Usually, without really meaning to, I make friends with the model and basically we just get silly and have a lot of fun – and I get to capture that! 

The great thing about both though is that I can learn from each and apply it to the other, such as learning how to deal with pouring rain working with the paper, I can apply to my commercial work, and I can also learn more natural poses from models that I can sometimes apply to farmers.

by Chloe Smith

What are you working on at the moment?
Nothing major at the moment! After a busy year of working four jobs and getting into the swing of working for a newspaper as well as starting my own business, I’m just starting to slow down a little bit. I have decided to get back to shooting more for myself though, and getting back into shooting the little magic moments that are often missed, and just the way I see things – in a lot of light and colour. 

by Chloe Smith

Who and/or what inspires you?
I am inspired by a lot of things, but the number one would have to be sunshine. I love sunlight – pure bright summer sunlight. It brings out all the colours, which is something I’m also very inspired by! Throw in a bit of ocean and nature (and some laughter), and I’m buzzing. 

by Chloe Smith

How would you describe your style?
Bright, colourful and happy!

by Chloe Smith

What has been the most rewarding part of your career so far?
Every day for me is rewarding! And each in a totally different way to the last. Some of my work has been published in a book and also a magazine, and that is definitely one of the highlights! Seeing my work in print every week with the paper is always exciting! But the most rewarding thing is all the incredible friends I’ve made since the start. I’ve made amazing friends at PSC and out and about at work, including models I have worked with who are now some of my best friends. The support that comes from all of them I can’t even put into words, but my friends are by far the most rewarding thing that has come out of picking up a camera (literally tearing up now thinking about it – haha!). 

by Chloe Smith

What advice would you give to current PSC students or people thinking of enrolling at PSC?
If you have an inkling of enjoyment for photography, just go and do it! Make sure to stick to your gut, your passions and your outlook. Make work that is you, and the rest will come naturally. 

You can see more of Chloe’s work on her Instagram and website.

Our full time Bachelor degree and part time Advanced Diploma courses for 2017 are still open for application, so if you’re interested in following Chloe’s footsteps, give us a call on (03) 9682 3191 or visit our website.

PSC pals – A new student mentor program for 2017 – Featuring Monica Willmott

Starting in 2017, we have a new student peer-to-peer mentoring program called PSC pals. The program gives current second and third year students the ability to mentor and support students who are new to PSC.

Throughout the year in 2017, we will be bringing you updates from the PSC pals program, but until then we will be featuring one of the PSC pals student mentors here on our blog and on our social media channels per week until the start of semester one.

For our fourth week, we’re glad to feature Monica Willmott (second year 2017).

by Monica Willmott