PSC Weekly Wrap

STUDENT: Rakuto Makino. 1st year
ASSIGNMENT: Major Project Folio.
STUDENT COMMENT: ”This image was taken as part of my major. I have always been inspired by early 20th century high fashion photography. In this particular image I wanted to create something simple but strong. I’m happy with how the image has such strong texture and detail in clothes. Thanks regards Rakuto”

PSC Weekly Wrap

STUDENT: Graeme Passmore
ASSIGNMENT: Moving Image Course
STUDENT COMMENT: “This video was produced for Nic Kochers moving image course, which we all incredibly enjoyed. Using our visual techniques used for stills, we were able to get creative with quite a open brief and incorparate those skills into moving image. This particular project was pretty funny, alot of fun was had. After plan A (shooting a band) was cancelled along with plan B I was left with plan C, moching up a classic hip hop song. It’s crazy to think what you come up with when the cards are down. Keep it creative and take risk and you cannot go wrong.”

Martine Deflander’s images to feature in ‘Temporarily Lost’

First year student Martine Deflander will have a few images showing in the ‘Temporarily Lost’ – photography night walks first projection exhibition. This exhibition is a collection of night photographs taken over the past 18 months from over 100 photographers.

Opening night Wednesday 19th October 6pm to 8pm

Screening times Wednesday 19th – 30th October 5pm till late (daily)

Rear of Cicciolina laneway, 130 Acland Street St Kilda. 
Proudly sponsored by the City of Port Phillip

Further information!/photographynightwalks

First Year Students at PSC!

The students in the first year “Working with Light & Photographic Technique” class are continuing to produce fantatsic work while enjoying their first experiences in a studio enviroment…

Along with their work in the studio they have also explored the city’s laneways to continue their studies of the natural light…

Fresh 11 Art Graduate Exhibition

25 November 2011 will see the opening of works by PSC Art Specialisation students as new emerging artists bringing their unique style to the industry.

Filled with eccentricity, innovations and unconventional perspectives this exhibition premiers the journey from student to professional, providing a platform to voice each student’s idiosyncrasies through image making.

Fresh 11 promises to be an exhibition with a refreshing twist.  Don’t miss it.  Showing from 25 November to 11 December at the Yarra Sculpture Gallery 117 Vere Street, Abbotsford.



PSC Weekly Wrap

A new regular segment highlighting PSC student’s work.

STUDENT: Jessica Pettingill. Second Year
ASSIGNMENT: Low key print assignment for Craig Shell
STUDENT COMMENT: ‘Inspiration: women’s fashion 1930’s, experimenting with different materials over face, glamour, elegance, sensual. I am very happy with the end result, I enjoy shooting in the studio with different models and lighting techniques. I think that the model is very well suited to the style of photograph.’

10 Questions for Visual Artist Sarina Lirosi

Over the years, Sarina has exhibited in numerous solo, group, curated, and award exhibitions around Australia. Although she began as a painter and sculptor, in the past ten years her practice has evolved to incorporate photography and installation-based works. Sarina’s practice examines the seemingly ordinary and it’s potential for surreal or extraordinary manifestations. She also has a broad fascination with “the absurd” especially in relation to the human condition. She holds a Degree in Visual Art Education from Melbourne University and in 1996 – completed a Master of Fine Art at RMIT University. Sarina has lectured at Swinburne University, the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne and has been teaching at Photography Studies College Melbourne since 1990.

1. What did you want to be when you grew up?

A classical ballerina.

2. When did you decide to pursue art as a career?

At 15 – when I designed a “Sherbet” T-shirt.

3. How would you describe your work to a complete stranger?

Mixed media with a repulsive humorous edge.

4. What is the most important idea, issue, dilemma or thing that you want to address in your art?

Life is absurd.

5. What are the most important influences that have moved you as an artist?

Walking into the Cappella degli Scrovegni in Padova and confronted by Giotto’s incredible frescoes.
Seeing Fra Angelico’s The Annunciation in the convent of San Marco, Firenze – four separate times and always in awe.
Reading The Unspeakable Confessions of Salvador Dali as told to Andre Parinaud.
Reading Dianne Arbus: A Biography by Patricia Bosworth.
The words and music of Nick Cave – in fact anything Nick Cave!

6. Do you visualise your Art before creating? Do you know what it will look like before you begin? What’s your process?

My head is constantly full of ideas, schemes and plans. I throw things around in my head for months and months before beginning a project. Then I start to play, experiment and make stuff. Through this process the work starts to form over 12-18 months – sometimes longer.

7. How important do you think it is for artists to know about art history, and why?

There is no point in reinventing the wheel is there?

8. How do you define success, and what keeps you going?

“Success” is when I have come even remotely close to making work that is unforgettable, thought provoking and that stands the test of time. This pursuit keeps me going.

9. What are some fun facts about you that may or may not be directly related to your art?

I fear birds yet I am drawn to them (from a distance – in books) – I don’t want them on me!! Is that a fun fact?
I have a dog on Prozac- but she is still nuts!
I used to run mini marathons and taught aerobics in the 1980’s (but I NEVER EVER wore leg warmers!!)

10. What hangs on your walls? Do you collect the work of other artists?

I love buying work from other artists (that I can afford). I especially like to support emerging artists and students. The work ranges from the surreal and strange to the sublime. I also sometimes put my own work up – just to live with it for a while.